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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Audi R8 (2014): Audi's plan to replace its mid-engined supercar
Carbon and aluminium for the next 2014 R8

The current 100% aluminium-based ASF structure gives way to a multi-material mix on the new R8, introducing carbonfibre for the rear firewall, the transmission tunnel and the B-posts that double-act as rollover protection elements.

This approach makes the body in white 24 kilos lighter and 13% stiffer, CAR understands. The total kerbweight is expected to tumble by a stout 100kg.

Engines in the new Audi R8

While the base model remains loyal to the naturally aspirated V8 good for 450bhp, the power output of the V10 version goes up to 550bhp. Mid-term, the relatively thirsty if charismatic ten-cylinder may give way to a turbocharged 4.0-litre V8 good for 600bhp; the latter is the same engine you'll find in the Audi S8 and, soon, the Bentley Continental GT.

One year after the R8 coupe, the new R8 Spyder should be ready to charm the in-crowd with a launch in 2015.

The new R8, and its Lamborghini twin, the Gallardo replacement coming in 2013, will both stick with the MSS (modular sports car system) architecture masterminded by Audi. But the generation after that will be part of MSB-M (modular rear-wheel drive maxtrix, mid-engined variant) conceived by Porsche.


^An artist's guess.

So, the next Gallardo isn't really a Lambo, but an Audi. The same strategy for their SUV's is being applied to their super-cars. OK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
2014 Lamborghini Huracán LP 610-4 / 2016 Audi R8

<iframe width="640" height="480" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/V4ddf_Xg7W8?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Update!

These Lamborghini Huracan LP610-4 Photos Look Real to Us…
So, remember the purportedly official photo of the Lamborghini Gallardo's replacement called the Huracan that we first you showed you last night and which has been making the internet rounds this morning? What the blog that posted it didn't say last night, is where they found the single photo.
Well, we did some detective work this morning and confirmed the source: Italy's LaStampa. Actually, we did more than that; as it turns out, the same site had four more photos that have been since removed, but fret not, as we managed to recover them…

Yes, all exterior photos have a computer render-feel to them, but this isn't something we haven't seen before from automakers, while we also have a pretty detailed interior photo.

Taking everything into account, including the fact that they were eliminated, we're leaning towards official shots on this one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Update!

The new Lamborghini Huracán LP 610-4: A new dimension in Luxury Super Sports Cars
- Innovative technology and absolute performance redefine the super sports car experience
- Pure and powerfully dynamic design language
- New V10 with 610 hp, acceleration from 0-100 km/h in 3.2 seconds, top speed of over 325 km/h
- From January 2014: private preview events for qualified prospects

A new era is beginning for Automobili Lamborghini and the luxury super sports car segment: with the brand new Huracán Lamborghini is not only presenting the successor to the iconic Gallardo, but is also redefining the benchmark for luxury super sports cars in this segment. With its pure and unique design, an innovative technology package, outstanding dynamics and excellent quality, the Huracán offers a super sports car experience on a whole new level. The Huracán combines absolute performance with easy-todrive road behavior and both luxurious and sport-oriented finish. With the Huracán, Lamborghini is taking a big step into the future, and enhancing the brand's illustrious history with the next automotive legend.

Starting from January 2014 the Huracán will be the protagonist of over 130 private preview events in more than 60 cities throughout the world. The Lamborghini Huracán will make its world public debut at the Geneva Motorshow 2014.

Name

With a total volume of 14,022 cars produced, the Lamborghini Gallardo has been the most successful Lamborghini ever and, in its ten-year lifecycle, lifted the Lamborghini marque to a whole new level. Its successor, the new Huracán, has been developed from scratch down to the very last detail and, like the Gallardo and most other Lamborghini models, derives its name from the world of bullfighting. The fighting bull Huracán of the Spanish Conte de la Patilla breed was known for his outstanding courage and strong sense of attack. He fought in Alicante in August 1879, showing his unrelenting character and remaining defiant and invincible, thus entering into the legend of fighting bulls' history.

Design

The new Huracán revolutionizes the design language of the Gallardo and is pure in its lines: precise technology and top level craftsmanship meet an audacious design with sharp edges, monolithic and sculptured volumes and precise surfaces. The starting point is the silhouette of the Huracán, born out of the desire of creating an automobile, whose profile is defined by only one line that merges the front with the cockpit and the rear of the car. The lateral windows come together to create a hexagonal form inserted like a glass jewel in the car's profile.

Also by night is the Huracán unmistakably a Lamborghini. Not only are the main headlamps equipped with full LED illumination, but all other light functions also feature state-of-the-art LED technology as a standard feature for the first time in the segment.

Interior

The interior is dominated by an innovative cockpit. A 12.3 inch full-color TFT instrument panel delivers all car information to the driver, from rev counter to navigation maps and infotainment functions, and can be configured by the driver in different setups. Fine Nappa leather and Alcantara distinguish the interior, with several color combinations offered to ensure broad individualization options. The design of dashboard and central tunnel underline a new lightness in the interior. Superb craftsmanship guarantees the highest quality and sense of luxury throughout.

Chassis and powertrain

Systematic lightweight design and Automobili Lamborghini's extensive expertise in carbon fiber come together in the Huracán's new hybrid chassis -- an integrated structure of carbon and aluminum elements. With a dry weight of 1,422 kg it enables not only the excellent power-to-weight ratio of just 2.33 kilograms per horse power, but also guarantees race-car precision with outstanding stiffness.

The new 5.2 liter V10 engine delivers a maximum power of 448 kW / 610 HP at 8,250 rpm and a maximum torque of 560 Nm at 6.500 rpm. In the new ''Iniezione Diretta Stratificata'' (IDS), direct and indirect gasoline injections are smartly combined. This results in more power and torque with lower fuel consumption and emissions compared with the Gallardo V10 engine. The top speed of over 325 km/h and the acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h in 3.2 seconds and to 200 km/h in 9.9 seconds only partially describe the dynamic experience at the wheel of the Huracán. Also thanks to the Stop & Start technology, the combined EU consumption figure has been further reduced to 12.5 liters per 100 km (290 g/km CO2 emissions). The engine complies with EU6 emissions regulation.

Driving dynamics

The power of the V10 engine is brought to the road via the new 7-speed dualclutch transmission ''Lamborghini Doppia Frizione'' (LDF) and fully electronically controlled four-wheel drive system. The different driving modes of the Huracán can be selected via a driving dynamics selector switch in the steering wheel - from traction-oriented on the road to extreme performance on the race track, with three setups of the dynamics system: STRADA, SPORT and CORSA. The different modes ensure extensive modification in road behavior of the Huracán. In particular they influence the set-ups of several systems, such as the gearbox and engine behavior, the sound, the four-wheel-drive system and electronic stability control. The Huracán's carbon-ceramic brakes are a standard feature for consistently superb braking performance. The ''Lamborghini Dynamic Steering'' variable steering ratio system and magneto-rheologic suspension damper control are both available as options for further customization of the Huracán's dynamic behavior. They are also calibrated via the three different dynamic set-ups.

The Huracán is produced at the Automobili Lamborghini headquarters in Sant'Agata Bolognese on an entirely newly-equipped production line. Delivery to the first customers is planned for spring 2014.








 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
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The latest supercar to come from Lamborghini, the Huracan, has been spotted shooting a TV commercial finished in an absolutely stunning shade of orange.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
<iframe width="640" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/eJnWPhSQjPs?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Welcome to the new Lamborghini Huracán LP 610-4.
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A new era is beginning in the luxury supersports car segment.
The new Lamborghini Huracán, with its pure and unique design, an innovative technology package and outstanding dynamics, debuts at 2014 Geneva International Motor Show.
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
<iframe width="640" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/vuEMhfD0eCI?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Interview with Filippo Perini, Head of Design at Automobili Lamborghini, about the LB 724 concept a.k.a. Lamborghini Huracán: a car with a clear and extreme design but at the same time daily usable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Update!

Lamborghini Huracan first drive review
http://www.autocar.co.uk/car-review...-huracan-first-drive-review-exclusive-new-pic
The successor to Lamborghini's Gallardo is a more grown-up supercar, and that suits us down to the ground

What is it like?

Great, albeit in a new wave, old school kind of way. When you thumb the starter button and the V10 engine catches, for example, there is still the same sense of theatre in evidence as there was with the Gallardo.

Like it or not, there's an almighty burst of revs at start-up, and even once the V10 settles to its idle speed of just under 1000rpm there’s still an old fashioned supercar kind of racket to be heard from behind your head. And the Huracán wouldn’t be a Lamborghini were this not so.

On the move the car instantly feels more refined but also more comfortable than the Gallardo. There's a sense of maturity to the ride, steering response (no kickback whatsoever detectable), throttle weighting and even the exhaust note that elevates it well beyond its predecessor. But beneath the sheen of extra smoothness and civility there is still the raging heart of a conventional V10 supercar, thumping away, itching to let loose.

This time, though, you get the distinct impression that the car's numerous electronic systems are very much there to help out, if and when things go wrong. The car feels so much less edgy and rounded in its resolve, you probably don't need the digital safety net to be anywhere near as great ironically.

But that's the way Lamborghini knows it needs to play things in 2014. Nowadays, the vast majority customers aren't in the slightest bit interested in scaring themselves every now and again.

Instead they want a car that looks beautiful (tick), sounds amazing (tick), that is easy enough to drive and that they could use it everyday if necessary (tick) and which won't bite their arms off if they make a mistake in it (tick).

The compromise is that the Huracán probably understeers a touch more than a die-hard purist would want it to, and the engine note does sound more Ingolstadt than Sant Agata on occasions; particularly on overrun in Corsa mode when you get a digitally perfected crackle that sounds neither natural nor spine-tingling.

But in just about all other respects, the Huracán represents a huge leap forwards for Lamborghini. And I personally happen to think it looks close to drop-dead gorgeous, too.

Should I buy one?
Lamborghini would certainly like it if you did, although the competition at this level, at this particular moment in time, is so fierce that you do wonder how many Huracán’s Sant Agata will shift in the longer term, certainly in its more traditional markets of the USA and Europe, both of which are continuing to shrink, albeit glacially.

In China, however, the Huracán no doubt will fly like the wind it is loosely named after, and that alone will keep the Raging Bull's accountants happy for the time being.

Crucially, the Huracán is also very competitively priced beside its key rivals from McLaren and Ferrari at £188k, even if the new Audi R8 and current Porsche 911 Turbo will and already do make it seem fairly expensive.

What matters most, though, is the way it drives, which in the most part means: beautifully.

It's a more modern and capable car than the one it replaces but it's also a proper, hairy-chested Lambo at heart. And in this day and age that's really rather refreshing.
Lamborghini Huracan LP 610-4 2014 review
http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/lamborghini/huracan/86847/lamborghini-huracan-lp-610-4-2014-review
New Lamborghini Huracan LP 610-4 replaces Gallardo, and Lambo's smallest car is better than ever

Verdict


The Gallardo has grown up and Lamborghini has created a car with all the style and noise its customers expect, but that’s easier to drive everyday and friendlier on the ragged edge. For that reason it’s a huge improvement over its predecessor and will appeal to a wider audience. Whether it’s exciting enough to see off the Ferrari 458 and McLaren 650S though, remains to be seen…
Lamborghini Huracan LP610-4 (2014) CAR review
http://www.carmagazine.co.uk/Drives.../Lamborghini-Huracan-LP610-4-2014-CAR-review/
How similar does it feel to a 458?

Nothing like it. The Ferrari shrieks, the Lambo growls. The Ferrari’s ergonomics require spoon-bending levels of concentration to comprehend and the interior doesn’t feel as special as the Huracan’s. Obviously the fact that one is four-wheel drive, the other rear-wheel drive, makes a difference, but the real division is in the philosophy behind them.

For some reason only Ferrari sets its cars up to encourage you to explore the limits, and makes those limits accessible, even to drivers with modest talents.

You really have to be trying hard to find out what’s behind the Huracan’s fun, but efficiency-over-exhuberence, grip-and-go veneer.

In fact, get past the understeer (we’d upgrade the P Zeros to Corsas immediately) and what's there is a nicely balanced car, and easing back on the gas mid corner tightens your line perfectly, allowing you to get back on the throttle and exit in a lovely neutral stance. We can understand that your average Asian millionaire isn’t going to be an F1-star in waiting, but why is even an R8 (from understeer kings, Audi) more oversteery?

Verdict

We knew the Gallardo was lagging behind its rivals in key areas, including the transmission, but driving the new machine really rams it home. This is a far more sophisticated car that's faster, more refined and much easier to drive fast or slow. The mellower but equally punchy engine would be far less tiresome than a 458's on a long trip, and the ergonomics are easier to fathom. The more relaxed steering is more instinctive, too.

We think they both look sensational, but there’s even a good chance that many people will prefer the Lambo’s styling. So why would we still put a 458 in the garage? Because it’s more playful, so much easier to really exploit and because it sounds like it should have a set of numbers on the doors.

The Huracan is great, and Lambo will sell loads. It makes a better daily driver but we’re not convinced it’s more exciting than the Ferrari. And excitement is the point of a supercar, right? Horses for courses, but ours is prancing, at least until the Superleggera arrives.
First drive: Lamborghini Huracan
http://www.topgear.com/uk/car-news/lamborghini-huracan-first-drive-car-review-2014-05-01
The Gallardo’s replacement is here. Can it outgun the Ferrari 458 and McLaren 650S? Over to Charlie Turner

So how does it drive?


Our first shot in the Huracan is at the Ascari track under the baking glare of the Spanish sun. I'm led out by a Lamborghini test drivers in a lime green Aventador Roadster. After a sighting lap the pace builds, and as I uncoil the Huracan, two things become immediately clear. First, that the Huracan has traded in none of the Gallardo’s trademark Lamborghini DNA. The V10 is a fabulous accompaniment to proceedings and the perfect advert for the purity of a naturally aspirated engine, snarling its way to the 8500rpm with relish.

Secondly, the Huracan has a suppleness to its suspension that distinguishes it from the opposition. As the laps accumulate and the speed builds, it’s a suppleness that inspires real confidence, helping TG to stay pinned to the back of that Aventador in all but Ascari’s longest straight. This is a seriously rapid car.

The instant response of the new gearbox is fabulous, and a quantum leap forwards from the Gallardo’s thunky transmission. As are the stability systems, which Lambo says utilise the same technology that keeps complex fighter jets aloft, a fiendish combination of three accelerometers and three gyros. Well, if it's good enough for the EuroFighter...

Confident in the fact that there's a 4WD safety net in place, it’s easy to dig into the Huracan’s chassis capabilities. Dive into a corner too deep and initially the front end will wash wide, but counter that on the throttle and the nose nips back into line as the four-wheel drive system juggles torque between front and rear, dragging you out of the bend and down to the next braking zone. The carbon ceramic brakes are fabulously strong, too, hauling the Huracan down from triple-figure speeds time and time again without fading.

The car we drove featured Lamborghini’s new active electric steering, which varies in rate depending upon ‘Anima’ setting, and can make minor adjustments to steering angle at the limit if necessary. Thankfully the active element is unobtrusive, and for 99 per cent of the time, 99 per cent of Huracan owners will merely be aware of a nicely weighted lightness to the steering in all types of driving.

After four track sessions it's clear the Huracan is a huge leap forward from its predecessor. This is a car that positively encourages you investigate the depths of its talents, and flatters you throughout the process. It's a car that knows its audience: those who want a car with huge potential, but enough of a buffer to encourage them closer to the limit.

What about on the road?

Just as impressive. The Huracan is as cheery pottering about at low revs in seventh as it is blistering down a mountain pass with a speed and surety that few can rival. It’s a car that’d destroy a trans-continental trek before eking every micron of grip from your favourite back road. It is, in other words, a supercar for the real world, if such a thing exists.

It was bone-dry during our time with the Huracan, but soon enough we'll find out how it handles a damp British B-road. I have no doubt it will shine. The pliancy of its ride, combined with the grip served through the 4WD and traction systems, could make this the supercar of choice for the UK. Time will tell. On the downside, those on-wheel indicator buttons are fiddly and annoying.

How does it compare to the Ferrari and McLaren?

According to the official numbers, the Huracan will split the 458 and 650S (on P-Zero Corsa tyres) on a 0-62mph dash, getting there a tenth of a second ahead of the Ferrari but two-tenths behind the McLaren. The Huracan’s top speed is identical to the Ferrari at 202mph, though the Lambo can’t match the McLaren’s 207mph max.

So if pub stats are all you care about, the 650S is a marginally faster braggin’ wagon. But supercars are about more than pure maths. They’re about drama, too, and Lamborghinis have been delivering high theatre since the 350GT first turned a wheel. The Huracan delivers more of the same.

Its uncluttered exterior might disappoint those who hoped the Huracan would be a production version of the Sesto Elemento. But the more time I spent with the shape, the more I loved it, and that sophisticated simplicity masks a car that oozes adrenaline from every pore.

By spurning the trend towards turbochargers, Lamborghini ran the risk of being outclassed in the performance credentials. No chance of that. The V10 is a masterpiece, not only dishing more than enough power to keep the 458 and 650S honest, but also delivering the life and soul of the Lamborghini experience. Chuck in that sublime new transmission, four-wheel drive, stability systems that can not only keep fighter jets in the air but subtly convince you of your own Driving God status, and it’s clear the Huracan is a mighty thorn in the side of the opposition.

The Gallardo was once described to me by one of Lamborghini's legendary test drivers as ‘the bull with no bulls**t’. A decade on, the Huracan more than lives up to that brief.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
<iframe width="640" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/oBDRU83JeAM?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
The Lamborghini Huracan is a glorious fusion of modern technology and old-school Lamborghini theatrics.

The new Lamborghini Huracan LP6104 has a big task on its hands.

Not only must it beat the Ferrari 458 and the McLaren 650S, it needs to outperform the Gallardo - the car it replaced - in the showroom, as the Gallardo was the manufacturer's best-selling model ever, with 14,000 sold over a 10-year career.

Happily, the Lamborghini Huracan gets off to the best possible start. Perhaps the design is a little conservative by Lamborghini's standards, but in the flesh, the aggressive proportions, aggressive front end and floating C-Pillar push all the right buttons.

Like in the Lamborghini Aventador, the interior of the Huracan pays homage to fighter jets, with a flip-up ignition switch, angles everywhere and a new cockpit-like 12.3-inch digital instrument display behind the wheel that can be configured in a variety of ways.

The Lamborghini Huracan also gets a whole range of brand-new technologies.

For starters, there's this all new chassis which is made from a combination of aluminium and carbon fibre. This makes the Huracan not only 10 per cent lighter than the Gallardo, but also 50 per cent stiffer.

There are also new three-stage adaptive dampers, as well as a variable ratio electro-mechanical steering system that varies the ratio on how quick you're driving.

A new electronically controlled four-wheel drive system can send up to 70 per cent of the power to the Huracan's rear-wheels in normal driving, and up to 100 per cent when you really need it.

Most importantly on the new Lamborghini Huracan, though, is a new, seven-speed twin-clutch box that shouldn't feel like you're getting kicked in the head every time you change gear.

Rather than downsizing or turbocharging, Lamborghini has stuck to its guns by using a developed version of the Gallardo's naturally aspirated 5.2-litre V10.

The Lamborghini Huracan gets stop-start and a few other tweaks to make it a little bit cleaner, but most importantly, it's now got 602bhp and 560Nm of torque. It'll do 0-60 in 3.2 seconds and it has a top-speed of 202mph.

The Lamborghini Huracan's acceleration is pretty vivid. Perhaps it doesn't quite have the free-revving nature of a Ferrari 458 or the turbocharged hit of a McLaren 650S, but it's definitely lost none of the aural drama that the Gallardo had.

The biggest change here with the Lamborghini Huracan, though, is its breadth of abilities.

It has something called the 'Anima' switch, meaning it has three driving modes. In 'Strada' mode, it softens the suspension and dials back the ferocity of the steering, the gearbox and the throttle.

'Sport' mode is somewhat of an interim mode and it's pretty good for fast-driving on road. But since we're testing the Lamborghini Huracan at the amazing Ascari circuit in Spain, it would be a shame if we didn't go for the full-fat 'Corsa' mode.

Fling it into a corner and the steering is quite light, but it's absolutely pin-sharp. In terms of feel, it's a bit like a Ferrari 458 and you can feel the variable ratio really helping you out, meaning there's no full-opposite lock.

The carbon ceramic brakes on the Lamborghini Huracan are standard-fit now, and they're absolutely brutal in the way they stop the car.

With the four-wheel drive system, there's also tonnes of grip. However, if you provoke the Huracan a bit, you can get it to act a bit like a rear-wheel drive car.

Perhaps it's not as lairy as the Gallardo used to be - that used to like to gets its tail out at the slightest provocation - but you can still have some fun with this thing and feel it moving underneath you. The tech used in the Huracan can also make a pretty average driver look pretty spectacular.

The question is though, is do you actually want a Lamborghini that flatters you and covers up all your driving mistakes? Some will say that a Lamborghini should scare the life out of you and your passenger. Then it should spit you into a hedge when you're not at the top of your game.

But, we'd disagree because the new Huracan is a glorious fusion of modern electronics and old-school theatrics.

If you want something that drives like a pig and breaks-down every five minutes, you can always take your £186,000 and spend it on something from Lamborghini's back catalogue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
<iframe width="640" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/VJZR_GMWMLY?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
The new Lamborghini Huracan replaces the supercar maker's most successful model ever, the Gallardo. With a more powerful V10 engine that tops 600bhp and a host of new technology compared to its predecessor, can it be mentioned in the same breath as the fantastic Ferrari 458?
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
<iframe width="640" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/OMv1sFTTqFE?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Can Lamborghini's latest supercar take the fight to Ferrari, McLaren and Porsche? Steve Sutcliffe heads to Ronda in Spain to find out.
 
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