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I recently went to a track session at Willow Springs Raceway and had some fun. After the event my brakes were fine, there was no noise coming from them, I never really had any fade during the session. On my way bake after driving for about 50 miles on the freeway I had to brake for some crappy LA traffic on the 405. My brakes then emitted a screech. It kept on doing this even at low speeds. I know the sound is coming from my front brakes. My friend suggested that my pads could be glazed or my rotors are warped. I am guessing that they are either glazed or worn out. What confuses me is that I did not get this noise until after 50-60 miles of highway driving where I barkley touched the brakes (although I did a few times, but not hard). If they are galzed how do I go about fixing them. If they are worn out I was thinking of getting Porterfield R4S pads. I have heard amny good things about these pads. But how harsh are they on rotors?
thanks
 

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If the rotors/pads are glazed, they look glazed, ie. a very smooth polished or mirror-like surface without the fine scoring that fresh rotors/pads have. I had my rotors ground and replaced the pads an got most of the original performance back after running several track events.

I've used R4S pads for the last 25k miles and they're not hard on rotors at all and hold up much better than stock under severe duty. Like any brake pad, the R4S' performance diminishes after each track event. But at least they last to see another day, whereas the stock pads have been known to disintegrate after only one severe track day. If you run a lot of track events, then your rotors are likely to become glazed anyway and you'll want to replace or at least resurface them at some point too.
 

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Sounds like Glazing

Some people take a scotch-brite pas to the pad and scuff the rotors with a high-speed abrasive wheel. Make sure not to over-scuff the pads in one particular spot.
 
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