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Super Moderator
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Discussion Starter #1
China's nine-day traffic jam stretches 100km
BEIJING (AFP) – Thousands of vehicles were bogged down Monday in a more than 100-kilometre (62-mile) traffic jam leading to Beijing that has lasted nine days and highlights China's growing road congestion woes.

The Beijing-Tibet expressway slowed to a crawl on August 14 due to a spike in traffic by cargo-bearing heavy trucks heading to the capital, and compounded by road maintenance work that began five days later, the Global Times said.

The state-run newspaper said the jam between Beijing and Jining city had given birth to a mini-economy with local merchants capitalising on the stranded drivers' predicament by selling them water and food at inflated prices.

That stretch of highway linking Beijing with the northern province of Hebei and the Inner Mongolia region has become increasingly prone to massive jams as the capital of more than 20 million people sucks in huge shipments of goods.

Traffic slowed to a snail's pace in June and July for nearly a month, according to earlier press reports.

The latest clog has been worsened by the road improvement project, made necessary by highway damage caused by a steady increase in cargo traffic, the Global Times said.

China has embarked in recent years on a huge expansion of its national road system but soaring traffic periodically overwhelms the grid.

The congestion was expected to last into mid-September as the road project will not be finished until then, the newspaper said.

The roadway is a major artery for the supply of produce, coal and other goods to Beijing.












And people from SoCal complain.
 

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Daddy Daycare
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They'd get to their destination sooner by just leaving the car and walking. :chuckles:
 

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Super Moderator
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Discussion Starter #8
Update!


Ten days and counting, China traffic jam extends 60 miles

Tuesday marks the 10th day of a traffic jam extending more than 60 miles on China's Beijing-Tibet Expressway.

The congestion is a result of road construction that is expected to continue until mid-September, reports the Associated Press.

At one point, vehicles were moving little more than a half-mile a day. While traffic has improved since last weekend, there are reports of drivers who were stuck in the traffic for up to five days.

Villages bordering the expressway have taken this as an opportunity to increase the prices of food. Normally priced around 15 cents, a bottle of water has sold for up to $1.50.

In the meantime, authorities are advising drivers to take alternative routes. They are also asking trucking companies to postpone operations.


I hope no-ones holding it in. :rimshot:
 

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Boobze
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Update!

I hope no-ones holding it in. :rimshot:
I'm surprised crime hasn't sky rocketed. Police/rescue squads would have a hard time getting anywhere as well as the fact the these people are kinda stuck in the same place for a while.
 

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Super Moderator
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Discussion Starter #11
Update!

China Traffic Jam Could Last Into September‎
BEIJING—A 60-mile traffic jam near the Chinese capital could last until mid-September, officials say.

Traffic has been snarled along the outskirts of Beijing and is stretching toward the border of Inner Mongolia ever since roadwork on the Beijing-Tibet Highway started Aug. 13. The following week, parts of a major road circling Beijing were closed, further tightening overburdened roadways.

As the jam on the highway, also known as National Highway 110, passed the 10-day mark Tuesday, local authorities dispatched hundreds of police to keep order and to reroute cars and trucks carrying essential supplies, such as food or flammables, around the main bottleneck. There, vehicles were inching along little more than a third of a mile a day. Zhang Minghai, director of Zhangjiakou city's Traffic Management Bureau general office, said in a telephone interview he didn't expect the situation to return to normal until around Sept. 17 when road construction is scheduled to be finished and traffic lanes will open up.

Villagers along Highway 110 took advantage of the jam, selling drivers packets of instant noodles from roadside stands and, when traffic was at a standstill, moving between trucks and cars to hawk their wares.

Truck drivers, when they weren't complaining about the vendors overcharging for the food, kept busy playing card games. Their trucks, for the most part, are basic, blue-colored vehicles with no features added to help pamper drivers through long hauls.

Truck driver Long Jie said his usual trip from the coal boomtown of Baotou in Inner Mongolia to Beijing, which normally takes three days, was now taking him a week or more. The delay, he said, meant he would have to raise his rates above the usual 12,000 yuan, about $1,765, for a 30-ton truck full of cargo.

Sounding frazzled and tired, Mr. Long, a driver for Baotou Zengcai Shipping Co., said in a telephone interview that the traffic got a little better once he finally made it off the highway.

Though triggered by construction, the root cause for the congestion is chronic overcrowding on key national arteries. Automobile sales in China whizzed past the U.S. for the first time last year, as Chinese bought 13.6 million vehicles, compared with 9.4 million vehicles in 2008. China is racing to build new roads to ease the congestion, but that very construction is making traffic problems worse—at least temporarily.

China's roads suffer from extra wear and tear from illegally overloaded trucks, especially along key coal routes. Coal supplies move from Mongolia through the outskirts of the capital on their way to factories. There are few rail lines to handle the extra load. Though the current massive gridlock is unusual, thousands of trucks line up along the main thoroughfares into Beijing even on the best days.

Beijing is particularly prone to traffic jams because it is a bottleneck point. Drivers from the northwest have to navigate its rings of concentric circular highways to get to coastal ports or to head south. The sixth-ring road is the biggest, and until a new beltway is finished in the next few years, there is no alternative route around the capital.

Also entering the mix is the swell of passenger cars into the city from residents who have had to move farther from the capital to find affordable homes.

Other cities around the world face similar congestion headaches. The worst are in developing countries where the sudden rise of a car-buying middle class outpaces highway construction—unlike in the U.S., which had decades to develop transportation infrastructure to keep up with auto buyers.


****!
 

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SPREAD THE HATE
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Kingsford Charcoal should go there and film a commercial
"Slow down and grill"
:chuckles:
 

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Daddy Daycare
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^ You now have reason to say "it's not that bad" next time you're stuck in LA traffic. :chuckles:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Update!

China's monster traffic jam gone – for now
SOMEWHERE ON THE G6 HIGHWAY IN INNER MONGOLIA – It seemed like a good, if basic, plan for covering the story.

"The traffic jam is hitting cars going south in the direction towards Beijing so we'll be okay, driving north, filming it along the way from the other side of the median," I repeated one more time to no one in particular as we drove out towards Inner Mongolia.

Except that there was no traffic jam.

Certainly not the one dubbed "China's monster traffic jam" on Twitter and by Western media. Not the one that reportedly lasted ten days, spanned two provinces, stretched over 60 miles, and spawned a local economy.

Virtually overnight, local authorities had managed to disperse the congestion – about 120 miles northwest from Beijing – so by the time we reached the area, all we encountered were the garden-variety traffic jams here and there.
:applaud:
 
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