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DOИ'T bE BEETCH!
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi everyone. Today was a perfect day for a small project that I have been wanting to do for a while now. You know you own a celica when your door locks don't function :blah: We all know the reason it happens is because of a fairly expensive part - the door lock actuator.

This is a DIY repair procedure for your door lock actuator that i came up with.

I am not responsible or liable for any injury, damage, loss or expense that may result from this repair procedure and you sucking at it.

Time to complete 1-2 hours

Tools and supplies: Phillips head screwdriver, flashlight
T30 torx socket, parts cleaner
10mm socket with extension and a ratchet,
Small pry tool (small flat head screwdriver),
Razor blade, small hammer,
9v battery and test leads
Dielectric grease, white lithium grease and
1000 grit sand paper



Before you start, roll up your windows and disconnect your battery negative cable.

Start with removing your drivers or passenger side door panel, and part of the clear plastic cover that's behind it.



Look inside the door up where the door handle is, you'll see two metal cables with yellow clips on them, pry them off - the top one pries up and out away from the door handle, the bottom one up and towards yourself. Pull those cables out of sockets.



Find two 10mm bolts and remove them.



Remove three torx door lock bolts with your T30 socket.



Allow the lock to drop down, then disconnect the black electrical connector.



Now pull out the lock and actuator assembly with cables. Separate the white plastic cover that's held in place by 2 screws, then separate the plastic door lock actuator that's held in place by 2 screws.



Time to start working on the actuator. The idea here is to pry the actuator open without damaging it. Since it is not a "serviceable part", the actuator housing is molded together at the factory, this is where you will need your razor blade, small hammer and some patience.

Start on the corner by slicing your razor through the seam. (Be very careful not to injure yourself) Position the actuator vertically on a solid surface and tap the blade with the hammer until it gets in pretty deep, keep going around the actuator and get as much of it separated by the razor as you can. For the bottom part (next to the pin housing insert a small pry tool and carefully pry through that portion).









Now that you have it open, its time for a WTF moment, because there isn't much to the actuator at all, and you go scratching your head as to why Toyota wants $300 for it.........

Our goal right now is to remove the motor. I have done 2 actuators already and in both cases the problem was within the motor itself.

To remove the motor, first pry up on the gear and pull it out. (Don't worry it only goes in one way). Now pry the motor up on its plastic portion and pull it out. (The motor is not soldered in, so there is no wires to worry about, you will see once it comes out). Remove the worm gear and its bearing (note the way the bearing sits, it has to go back in the same way).



Now that you have the motor out, time to take it apart. With a sharp pry tool, pry out the metal tabs that hold the plastic backing in place, then VERY CAREFULLY pull the plastic portion out of the metal housing, you don't want to damage the brushes!!!!!! If the brushes are already damaged, or severely worn out, you can buy a replacement motor on EBAY http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...tor+FC+280PC+22125+&_sacat=See-All-Categories



Once you have that apart, you'll see how nasty the brushes look and how much old grease is gummed up in there, use electrical parts cleaner to spray off old grease, use 1000 sand paper to clean up the copper drum on the coil shaft, put small amount of white lithium on the copper parts and reassemble the motor.



Using your test leads and a 9v battery check motor operation. (Do not hold the motor on for longer than a few seconds, these motors are not designed for that.)



Reinstall the motor and gears in reverse order, apply superglue to the cover and join the cover and the housing together. Hold together until glued parts bond.





Reassemble everything in reverse order.

THAT'S IT, YOU ARE DONE!​




As I said before I have fixed two door lock actuators this way, in both cases I did not need a replacement motor, just needed to clean the old ones. IF it so happens that after you have re-installed everything and the locks are slow, get worse or still don't respond, replace the motor with http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...tor+FC+280PC+22125+&_sacat=See-All-Categories
Hopefully this will save you some money. Thanks for reading! :wiggle:

If you would like more information on the technical specs for the electrical motor, or possibly upgrading it, here is a link to OEM manufacturer for these motors http://www.mabuchi-motor.co.jp/cgi-bin/catalog/e_catalog.cgi?CAT_ID=fc_280pcsc

Good luck and don't lock yourself out!
 

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ninotnax
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Tagging this for when I get home - the images are blocked at my work. Excited to try this though! My '03 driver's side fails in extreme heat, or with repeated operation, but runs fine other wise.
 

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DOИ'T bE BEETCH!
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
^lol great minds think alike, nice find, I guess Lexus has that problem also.
 

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ninotnax
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OP: Major request. A lot of awesome guides, such as yours, become extinct in the future because the images are hosted elsewhere. Could you host them on newcelica via the "Gallery" link on the top, then re-do your image links?

To Mods: This should be a requirement for any how-to guide with images! I've found so many old guides where the pictures don't work.
 

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Good work. Stickied.
 

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ninotnax
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DOИ'T bE BEETCH!
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
When you took it apart did it have the collar?
are you talking about the splined part thats sitting on the end of the shaft that drives the worm gear? It had that, but it wasn't in a way, the metal housing with magnets and the rotor with coils stay together during the repair. And that splined part is removable. On the two actuators that I worked on, the collars were shaped differently, one was star shaped the other was square.

If you're getting a replacement motor, you can separate the collar and press it on the new motor.
 

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ninotnax
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Okay, I ordered 4 from this guy on ebay. I figure with the extras I can charge my friends to do their motors.

I didn't want to bother cleaning mine because I'm sure it's about fried or getting close, so I'm just opting to replace it. Seems the 22125 is the strongest motor, I just hope the phrase "The candle that burns twice as light lasts half as long" isn't true...







On a side note, anyone know how the back lock operates? Maybe even the window motor?
 

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ninotnax
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I wanted to add some input and pictures about my dis-assembly.

I purchased 4 new motors on eBay for $20, part number: FC-280PC-22125 (this appears to be the strongest made by Mabuchi)

Here's my drivers door motor, from a 2003 Celica with 108,000 miles. I had a car alarm installed around 70,000 miles that locks and unlocks the drivers door every time I turn the key in the ignition (for safety). This is to give you an idea of how often my motors run.

My motor would actually run fine unless it was in the heat or if I repeatedly hit lock/unlock in a row many times, then it would start to fail.

Here's what my motor looked like:



This next picture is after I cleaned the cap with Brake Cleaner, and then sprayed it down with Metal Protector. The right is a comparison of a brand new motor on cap.



Notice how the two blocks in the center of the "brush" are SO MUCH bigger compared to my worn out ones on the left? The motor on the left would probably still run for another few years, until they blocks were completely worn out.


And for sh!ts and giggles, here's a picture me compressing the cap on. I went nuts with clamps. Home Depot has some 1 inch clamps for $1.80



I used "Automotive Goop" because Super Clue was too thin and dried too fast. It didn't seal too well either.

You can test how well it's sealed by blowing into the connector. Before you cut it open you will notice no air blows out.
 

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Great write up. Seems that these door locks start to fail around 140k.

An alternative if you don't want to do the work yourself.

Bestbuy/Futureshop installers will install after-market door lock actuators for about $100 each.

This compares to $300 part + 200 labor that Toyota wanted from me.

I did this and saved a bundle. Works fine now.

** caveat; i had an aftermarket keyless entry unit. Don't know if that is required to get this aftermarket actuator working
 
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