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There are WAY too many questions about this, and seemingly much confusion. So I want to clear the air on what wideband O2 sensors are, how they are different from regular O2 sensors, who makes them, how you hook them up and why they are useful for tuning.

What came in my car from the factory?

Your car has a regular "narrow-band" oxygen sensor. Many manufacturers (especially recent Hondas like the RSX) like to claim to have wideband sensors, but they don't. Narrowband sensors have four wires going to them: +5V, a heater/ground circuit consisting of two wires, and a signal wire. The signal wire supplies the ECU with a 0-1V signal. Factory oxygen sensors have improved dramatically over the years, and are much more "wideband" than before, but they still aren't wideband sensors.

What is a wideband then and what does it do that my factory sensor does not?

A wideband O2 sensor has an output from 0-5V, a big part of the whole "wideband" thing. This means that AFR (air/fuel ratio) values are spread over a wider voltage range, giving much higher resolution than a 0-1V sensor. The bigger part of the wideband thing is the actual range of AFR's that a wideband is accurate over. Stock narrowband sensors are not accurate much richer than stoichiometric, where all tuning is done. The narrowband sensors are very affected by heat in this range, so over the course of a dyno pull, the rising exhaust temperatures will throw off the accuracy of the sensor. A wideband sensor itself is completely different than a factory sensor. For one, the sensor can't run off of the factory circuit, and requires a controller to function. Some widebands have this controller integrated into a gauge display while others have this controller as a separate box. Wideband sensors also have six wires running to them instead of four.

So then why don't I replace the factory O2 sensor with a wideband?
Slow down there turbo...while this sounds like a great idea, your ECU will not be happy with you. Whether you have the stock ECU, Power FC or an eManage, they will all be looking for the stock 0-1V signal.

But my wideband can output 0-1V, can't I just use that signal?
There are mixed reviews on this working or not. The AEM gauge-type has five programmable outputs, with two of those being 0-1V emulations. My car with a factory ECU would not work with either of those emulations running. There's also a very good reason not to do this, even if you could get it working: you will lose the 5V resolution on most widebands. Most wideband controllers have only one output, so if you select 0-1V, you will not be able to monitor the 0-5V signal. The exceptions are the AEM dual-channel, which has both a 0-1 and 0-5V output, but no gauge display (although the gauge is now offered separately) and the units from Innovative Motorsports. Considering that people have not been able to get the car running with the 0-1V emulation on the AEM gauge-type, buying the expensive dual-channel model seems like a big risk. So my advice is to not try this if you use the AEM unit. With the Innovative wideband, people have had success running the Celica, but have reported AFR instability at idle and have reverted back to the stock O2 sensor for ECU readings. It would seem that while in Innovative emulation is better than AEM's, it is still not suitable to make the car run properly. This could cause major problems when you try and pass emissions, as you would need to run the stock ECU and the unsteady AFR could cause a check engine light.

So if I have to keep my stock sensor, what good is it?
Finally to the point. A wideband O2 sensor is absolutely critical for tuning. You need to be able to monitor AFR in order to tune an engine. Period. The wideband is therefore a tuning aid, not an upgraded sensor. Additionally, a display of the AFR will tell you on the fly if your car is running lean and get you to back off before you ruin an engine. People used to use EGT probes/gauges for this purpose, because EGT is related to air fuel ratio. The reason this was done was because wideband O2 sensors were prohibitively expensive and not suited for permanent installation on cars. Affordable widebands make EGT gauges virtually obsolete.

Who makes wideband O2 sensors?
There are a few popular wideband O2 sensors: AEM, Innovative Mororsports, Zeitronix and PLX

-AEM make their UEGO (Universal Exhaust Gas Oxygen) sensors in three flavors: gauge-type, single-channel and dual-channel. The gauge-type looks like a standard 52mm air fuel gauge. The kit is supplied with the gauge/controller, a Bosch wideband sensor and a bung to weld into your exhaust. The gauge-type has a "user programmable" 0-5V output, which means you need to select one of five output modes. These modes include two 0-5V, one 1-2V and two 0-1V. Single and dual-channel models have the controller as a separate piece and include no display. These models are supplied with the controller, sensor and a bung. A gauge display can be purchased separately. The single-channel is the cheapest AEM wideband, since it basically functions the same as the gauge-type but does away with the display. The gauge-type UEGO is a good model for people who want a lot features for a low cost. It can be found for about $275 shipped, often times on eBay. Considering the problems people have had with narrowband emulations, the gauge-type is the best wideband for those who want a nice display of AFR. The dual-channel has the advantage of being able to output both a 0-5V and 0-1V signal simultaneously. This seemingly would allow you to eliminate the stock O2 sensor, run the 0-1V to the ECU and the 0-5V for logging, but people trying to use the 0-1V mode on the gauge-type to drive the ECU have been unsuccessful in making the car run. There is a possibility it would work, but seems to be an expensive gamble.

-Innovative Motorsports makes three different models, the LM-1, LC-1 and XD-1. The LM-1 is more of a shop unit and is not suited to permanent installation on a car because it comes with a large logging box that isn't suitable for mounting permanently. So we will talk about the LC-1 and XD-1. The big advantage to the LC-1 is cost. At $200, this is the lowest cost wideband on the market, and is the best wideband for someone who wants to spend the least money and doesn't care about a display. The system comes supplied with the sensor, a bung and the cable/controller. The controller has two analog outputs, both programmable. As long as you aren't interested in a display, the LC-1 is a very good and affordable unit. The direct competitor to the AEM gauge-type would be the XD-1. The XD-1 is essentially an LC-1 with a gauge display. Its biggest drawback is the $399 retail costof the system. Some sites say "call for special price", so I would expect to pay about $100 more for the XD-1 than the AEM UEGO. Again, given the problems people experience with the emulations, the extra cost of the XD-1 over the AEM is not worth it.

-Zeitronix makes a model called a ZT-2.

-PLX offers the M Series and R series. The M-300 has a digital display for AFR and offers a 0-5v linear output as well as a narrowband 0-1v emulation. People report that the 0-1v emulation works well on a 1990 Celica, but there is currently no info on its compatibility with the 7th gen ECU. Link to more info on the PLX:

http://www.plxdevices.com/M-Series_productinfo.htm


How do I install my wideband O2 sensor? (Thanks to DYI01)

The WBo2 needs a 12v power, ground, switch power (preferably ignition). I have a 12v line direct with an inline 10A fuse from the battery going to a relay. This relay can be purchased at Radio Shack http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062477&cp The part number of the relay is 275-226. The relay has switch power from the cigarette lighter's power wire, and I found a nice ground to the chassis under the center console. From the relay there is a power wire going to the Wbo2 power line. I grounded the WBo2 to the same place as the relay is grounded. After reading the AEM forums, this is how everyone suggests wiring the AEM UEGO guage type controller. It will eliminate most problems people have with wiring the WBo2. Most of the problems I read were caused by the gauge/controller not getting enough power from the electrical system. Some people would get screwy readings or none at all. By going straight to the battery you eliminate that issue and have a reliable and clean power source. It was just a tip that a lot of people were preaching about on the AEM forums. If you dont have any issues with the way you have it wired, I wouldnt worry about it.

To get the WBo2 to work with the FC-Datalogit you have to take the 0-5v output from the wbo2 and plug it into the AN1 input on the datalogit box. To get accurate reading from the Datalogit you also need to ground the AN2 as well to get rid of any floating voltages. Run a ground spliced from the WBo2 ground into AN2. Go to the 'setup auxilarys' window and click the 'delta AN1-AN2' check box in the lower left corner. then click 'ok' that should make the wideband work correctly with the datalogit.





A second install writeup on an Innovative LC-1 (thanks to blinding-gts)

This is a basic install guide for installing an Innovate O2 Wideband Sensor. Hopefully it will help anyone trying to do the install themselves even though it can be a daunting task for someone who has no electrical knowledge. I've included "basic" information how to install an O2 Bung and run the wiring for the LC-1.
Disclaimer: I take no fault if you screw up your car, LC-1, O2 Sensor, muffler, wife, dog/cat,etc during this install. If you're not sure what you are doing ask or let a professional do it. :)

1. Before you begin you have to prop the car up. You can either use a jack with support stands or ramps. Using the ramps is the method I went with. Make sure you lock the car from rolling by engaging the handbrake, putting the car in park (for auto) or in gear (for standard). For extra safety lock the wheels in place with some bricks. If you can't handle at least this I suggest you pack your stuff and take it to a pro to install.

2. Start this fairly early in the day so you have enough light or have a strong light ready to use when night hits. You should end up with something like the below picture.


3. Get under the car and make sure the exhaust is not hot (no brainer there). You have two options at this point. A and B.

A. You can remove the exhaust by removing the rubber clips+bolts that hold the center piece of the exhaust. This will make it MUCH easier for you to make a hole and weld on the bung.
If you decide to remove the exhaust make sure you support it before you unbolt everything as it will most likely drop on your face if not. Below is a picture of the four bolts you are looking to remove.



You will also have to disconnect the 2 stock O2 sensors that are on the exhaust. You can remove them either from the exhaust using a size 22mm hand wrench and the bolts using a 14mm deep well socket wrench. Note that the O2 sensors are made of a really weak metal and do bend under extreme pressure. You can also remove them by going inside the passenger side, disconnecting the wiring and pushing them through the rubber insulators.

B. You can leave the exhaust on and work under the car. This is MUCH harder to do but saves some work and time. I went with B since I have no issues working under the car with a welder.

4. At this point you are seeing the 2 stock O2 sensors still on the muffler. You are going to be working on the one before the cat closest to the engine. Remove it using a wrench giving you some more room to work with + keeping it out of harm's way when welding. Rest it somewhere safe (ie. underbody plastic). Do the same thing if you chose to remove the exhaust and left the sensors connected.


5. You should now make a point on the exhaust where you will install the bung. I suggest putting it a few inches away from the stock bung location. Make sure it goes before it (closer to the engine) at or above a 3 o'clock and 9 o'clock position. Anything below that and you're looking to ruin the wideband sensor when the car runs.

6. Place the bung on your install point and using a marker trace it. Then drill a hole in the exhaust and widen it to the bung size (no bigger) using a dremel, file or whatever you like. Clean out any pieces of metal that may have fallen in the exhaust. An easy way to do this is to use a vacuum on the stock O2 bung to suck up shavings as you're drilling. The hole should be wide enough to easily grab them. You should now be able to put the bung in halfway INTO the exhaust and end up with something like the pic below.


7. Block the open bung hole using the bung cap (comes with your bung) so no solder gets into the threaded grooves of the bung. Clear the exhaust of any rust/dirt using a metal brush. Get out the welder (you can use MIG,TIG, or a gas one-doesn't matter) and begin your welding. If you're using an electrical welder make sure you disconnect the battery from the car or you may end up with a surprise when you try to start it again. Weld from the outside in insuring that the metal of the exhaust is fusing with the welding metal and the bung.

8. Once you are done let it cool down and install the stock O2 sensor back. Start the car up and see if there are any leaks coming from your weld. If so, turn off, remove stock O2 and re-weld. Repeat until you get no exhaust fumes coming out from your welds. I also suggest getting some muffler cement as it helps keep things looking neater, slightly helps cool the temp around the O2 wideband and is a second insurance to a good weld for no leaks. It will end up looking like the pictures below.



Wiring of LC-1 and a Datalogit
9. Assuming all went well at this point you can install the LC-1. Connect it to the Wideband O2 sensor and run it alongside the walls of the car into the engine bay AWAY from the header and exhaust. Find a safe location for it and secure it. I ran mine on the passenger side of the engine and secured it.
Double check none of your wiring is near the engine or the exhaust.

10. At this point wiring is really a matter of preference. What I did was ran the IN/OUT serials into the passenger cabin using the firewall rubber and into my glove box. This made it easier for me to access the digital serial connections if I needed them.

11. Make sure the battery is disconnected again before you continue. I ran the analog wiring+pwr and grnd wiring to the driver side under the throttle wire of the engine bay. Going through the firewall I ran the following wires white, green, brown, yellow and black (see LC-1 user's manual for details) inside the car to the driver's side.
Leave the red and blue wires in the engine bay. Run the blue right to the battery's negative terminal. Ensure you have a relay switch which you can get at any electrical shop. It should have 4/5 ends. You will only use 4 of the ends. You basically want the relay to be on when the ignition key is turned on and off otherwise or you will drain your battery when the car is off. You will need to run an additional wire from the ignition switch to the relay in the engine bay to make use of the relay.
Connect the red wire to the relay switch. (I won't go into details with this for this write up how the relay is connected unless someone really wants to know). The other end of the relay will go on the battery's positive terminal. Make sure you put a fuse with a 5A minimum between the relay and the battery for protection of the LC-1.

12. You want to run an additional ground wire from inside the engine bay to the driver's compartment. This will be your ground wire for the Datalogit and the LC-1 ground points. It will prevent any floating values of ground line noise on the ground connections and keeps it away from the heater ground (blue wire) as per the LC-1 install manual. Connect it inside the engine bay on the engine OR on the transmission casing. Either is fine. Inside the driver's compartment connect the ground wire to the green and white wires of the LC-1 and then into AN2 on the Datalogit box. The yellow wire can be wrapped up as it will not be used in this setup. The brown wire can be connected to AN1 on the datalogit. Below is a pic of the wiring (MINUS the additional ground wire because I didn't have that setup yet when I took this picture).


13. Now you can setup the calibration wire (black) for the LC-1. This is really simple to do. You should have a switch and an LCD that was supplied with the LC-1 package. Simply pick a location and install the switch and light on the car's plastic. You will need to run a ground wire to the calibration switch in order for it to work. The way you do this is run an additional wire (green one in pic) from any metal contact on the car's body and wrap the other end on one end of the switch. You can go with what I did below for a clean look. Wire the switch, led and as illustrated below.




14. Solder then electrical tape the wires together for a clean setup. Then put everything in place and zip tie any loose wires. Do the same for any loose wires in the engine bay. Keep them away from any moving parts in the engine bay. You can install the Datalogit under the steering panel and keep it in place with velcro stickies. Make sure no wires get in the way of your brake, gas, or clutch pedals or the steering wheel column.

15. Re-connect the battery. Turn on the ignition, calibrate the LC-1 for free air using the calibration switch to see if everything is working. If everything was done right the LED will flash for a bit (20-30 seconds) then become solid red. You can now take readings via the Datalogit (analog)+laptop OR using the serial cable (digital) that's in the glove box with Innovate's Logworks 2 software and a laptop. The Datalogit will obviously have to be wired to an Apexi PFC but that's beyond the scope of this install guide.

After installation, what are known issues with widebands?

There are two problems people often face when trying to tune with wideband sensors that relate to the wiring of the system.

The first is simply electrical noise. If the system is not grouded well or there is just a lot of interferance from local power wires, users often see spikes in the wideband signal. This can be minimized in a number of ways:

1) Provide very good grounds for the widband sensors. Try 10 guage directly to the negative battery terminal to reduce noise.

2) Make sure wires are run as far as possible from high current power wires.

3) PLX devices recomends installing a 0.1 uFarad, 50 V monolithic capacitor between the wideband signal wire and the ground to act as a noise filter.

Keep in mind that in closed loop (idle and partial throttle) there will always be significant variation in the wideband signal due to the stock ECU continually reading the A/F and correcting back and forth. (people regularly see occilations between 12.5 and 15.5 at idle and low throttle)

A second issue people often encounter is called a ground bias. This occurs either if the wideband unit is grounded to a different location as the ECU/datalogging device, or if there are long runs of high guage wire that lead to losses.

This effect leads to a voltage difference between what you are using to datalog with and the wideband unit, so when the sensor if reading 14.7 A/F, your computer is reading some other ratio.

The effect is usually not huge, but can be significant if you need very accurate readings and is often what leads to differences between what dyno A/F guages read and what your onboard guage reads.

The redundant ground shown in the install diagram above should eliminate ground bias.
 

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is it ok to isntall wideband bung
right above the transition from 2.5" pipe to 2"
 

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its already installed I just double checking. I just want to make sure my wideband sensor is reading correctly
 

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kortik said:
is it ok to isntall wideband bung
right above the transition from 2.5" pipe to 2"
You have to be careful with that - if its too far upstream you will still have the divider plate in the pipe and you will only be reading 2 cylinders.
 

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no its not extremely deep upstream. I just put the bung right at the beginning of that transition to 2.5" on stock pipe. it maybe like 2" upstream from that picture above starting from the second bung
 

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kortik said:
no its not extremely deep upstream. I just put the bung right at the beginning of that transition to 2.5" on stock pipe. it maybe like 2" upstream from that picture above starting from the second bung
It should be fine. The thing is you also want to reduce heat on the sensor as well. Putting it too far upstream can cause some of the sensors to overheat which will cause O2 sensor failure in the long run.
 

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Thanks I'll keep that in mind. I've been running my wide band since August. w/no issues.
I just looked at this thread and noticed the location of the bung, was concern a bit.
 

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ok put my O2 bung on my PPE header right here before the flex pipe is it too far down?
 

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I have a question about grounding, basically do i have to splice into the gauge ground wire or Can I just ground my datalogic(AN2) directly to the same ground as the gauge, under the middle counsel?
 

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OK, for those running the Innovate wideband XD-16 with the LM-1:


You need to calibrate it, in order to have an accurate read out on the datalogit (the same as the gauge).

On FC edit clic on Set up, then auxiliary.
This will appear:

Where the red circle is you should change these to:
0v = 7.35
5v = 22.39

Then press on "OK". It should fix it. Keep in mind on some laptops it will not want to put a "." use a comma '','' instead.
To make sure you have the right values click on the ''poly" square (right underneath the A/F).
The "Setup Polynomial" screen will appear.
You should be seeing:
a=0
b=3.008
c=7.35
 

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I think it will also work...but if you look here:
at the end look what it says for proper calibration:
http://www.innovatemotorsports.com/support/quickstart/LC-1_Quickstart.pdf

It clearly says:"-Analog output two(brown) is setup as 0V=7.35 AFR and 5V=22.39 AFR."
Both might do the trick....but the recommended will yield a bit more resolution.
I'd rather have all the resolution of the gauge then just part of it.
 

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Guys, those 2 setup look very different to me! Beware and verify with them if your not sure. It's a bit confusing!

I'd think Many numbers are right since I have seen them everywhere in their LC-1 specification ..
 

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so do you guys hook up the LC1 and xd16 to PFC?
so PFC monitors a/f live so you dont even need xd16 gauge then?

I am running Hydra I wonder If I can do the same casue I dont have auto tune feature
 

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so do you guys hook up the LC1 and xd16 to PFC?
so PFC monitors a/f live so you dont even need xd16 gauge then?

I am running Hydra I wonder If I can do the same casue I dont have auto tune feature
Nope, Many log his AF on the datalogit (laptop), not on the PFC/commander directly.. The gauge is needed for everyday driving unless you have a laptop permanently installed in the car which monitors ..
 

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hold on so how does the datalog reads LC1. I thought you have to hook it up to datalogit in order to read a/f?
 

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I use this setup
0 V = 9 A/F
5 V = 16 A/F
for one year and I don't have any problem...

This setup is more accurate
of
0v = 7.35
5v = 22.39
 
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