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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Mods - please sticky in the appropriate guides section

Made a guide for adjusting the clutch pedal since I didn't see a comprehensive one on the boards.

After installing a new clutch it's customary to adjust the clutch pedal. This is especially true when switching to any aftermarket clutch. After installing a new clutch it's usually not necessary to bleed the hydraulics since you shouldn't have opened the brake fluids system. However, air in the hydraulics can also cause a similar 'squishy' symptom to the free play symptom that this guide aims to fix, or add, depending on your tastes.


When the pedal is relaxed (no pressure applied), the clutch is 'engaged'. When the pedal is depressed, the clutch is 'disengaged'.



Clutch disengagement points are based on taste. Some people (me :love:) like the clutch to begin disengagement immediately upon beginning the stroke of the clutch pedal with his/her foot. Some people like a later disengagement :marky:. As per the service manual, there is supposed to be 1mm-5mm of free play before any real resistance is felt. The less free play, the quicker the disengagement begins. With this adjustment, it's not possible to tune over what distance the clutch disengages (ie whether 20mm or 30mm of a stroke is required to take the clutch from 0% to 100% disengagement) - only when that disengagement begins.

Important It is necessary for there to be some free play, however little, before disengagement begins. If not then the clutch will always be disengaged to some degree even when your foot is off of the pedal - which means your clutch is slipping. Always err on the side of free play in the pedal rather than risk riding the clutch. If you're good you should be able to get less than the 1mm called for in the service manual. If you over do it, one possible sign will be the smell of burnt clutch even when you're not riding it.

Guide:

Sneak yourself into the driver side dashboard lower. The pushrod assembly is a brass color.

Release the lock nut that locks against the brass clevis housing. 12mm. Note that if you were sitting in the driver seat, it needs to be turned clockwise to loosen. We're facing the thing backwards.

You should now be able to spin the pushrod. If it feels seized up, as mine was, move the lock not all the way forward and continue to spin it once it runs up against the end of the threads; this will force the pushrod to spin as well and break it open.

Rotate the pushrod in either direction, to taste, and test the throw of the clutch pedal; adjust to your liking. The lock nut in its stuck position from the prior step can help you move it. Remember, the pedal NEEDS to have at least a touch of free play in it before resistance from the clutch actually disengaging is felt.

Tighten the lock nut back up against the clevis housing.

And that's it! Go grab yourself a beer even though it probably took less than 10 minutes to do - you earned it for maneuvering yourself down into that awkward position :drink:. The car should be much more of a pleasure to drive now, since it's tuned to your taste.



 

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Electromagnetic Wave :-h
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Nice, except
When the pedal is relaxed (no pressure applied), the clutch is 'disengaged'. When the pedal is depressed, the clutch is 'engaged'.
You have it backwards. Clutch is engaged to the flywheel when pedal is not depressed. When the pedal is pressed, the clutch is disengaged from the flywheel. What you are describing is the engagement of the hydraulics.
 

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^^^^ yes

and its not always necessary to do this with an aftermarket clutch. I have installed about 100 aftermarket clutches (mostly southbend) and never needed to do this.
 

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What's the board's opinion on extended clutch rods? I have slight engagement at full release that can't be fixed via adjustment (Fidanza flywheel, TRD clutch, 2000 GT-S, 2003 C60).

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
2kgts: Weren't you one of the originals that ran into that problem? Isn't is something like the friction plate of some Fidanzas are too thick for the stock slave push rod to handle? I think I read that an extended push rod is a suitable fix to that problem.

Smaay: I actually switched to a southbend and I really wasn't happy with the pedal feel which is why I went ahead and did this modification. I remember reading somewhere that you said there is indeed a different feel from the stock clutch, but that you like that feel. I wasn't a fan of it so I went ahead and changed it - this really helps the daily drivability of this car, especially in stop and go traffic. Before the tune the southbend's profile was really, really annoying me.
 

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2kgts: Weren't you one of the originals that ran into that problem? Isn't is something like the friction plate of some Fidanzas are too thick for the stock slave push rod to handle? I think I read that an extended push rod is a suitable fix to that problem.
I've not had the TRD clutch more than 2 years, IIRC. But I'd like to hear it'd solve the problem without issues!
 

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i just put in a spec stage four clutch a few months ago. never really been happy. it was always shaky and shifted very hard. pbcr snt me here. i realized i had two, almost three, inches of free play.

thanks to homeworld1031tx I now love my new clutch/short throw set up!
 
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