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Just ordered some Hotchkis Street Sways for the Celica. I don't really have the time or facilities to do this on my own, so Im going to send it in to my mechanic who has tools, lift, blah blah blah. What is a reasonable amount of time for this job (front and rear)?
 

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I just put the competition sway's in my car last week (after work at my shop on a lift).

It took me 4 hours, but it was because 2 of the bolts snapped their heads off on the brakcets so I had to drop the entire subframe and drill them out. what a PITA

Rear bar goes in the car in less than 10 minutes. Front can take some time, but not much longer than an hour and a bit if the bolts don't snap.
 

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The rear bar is stupid easy, unless you run into any snags. I'm slow as hell and it took me half an hour.

The front bar will just make your inside wheel spin more...
 

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The rear bar is stupid easy, unless you run into any snags. I'm slow as hell and it took me half an hour.

The front bar will just make your inside wheel spin more...
Do you think the front bar is worth installing? I already have the Hotchkis comp rear sway installed but I have not installed my front bar yet.
 

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no more than half an hour for the rear. all you have to do is unbolt the axleback (2 bolts) then remove the heat shield (4 bolts) and it's right there. No more than 2 hours for the front. though he's probably accounting for something to go wrong, which it usually does...
 

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Do you think the front bar is worth installing? I already have the Hotchkis comp rear sway installed but I have not installed my front bar yet.
For street driving, it's not a bad idea. It'll remove some of the body roll in the front and give you something more like a gokart. But for actual performance, it'll give you lots of inside wheelspin and will push the balance more towards understeer.

I've heard you can make it work, but only if you run a lot of front spring.

You have to drop the engine cradle to install...IMO, not worth the effort. I'm personally happy with the stock front bar as is.
 

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For street driving, it's not a bad idea. It'll remove some of the body roll in the front and give you something more like a gokart. But for actual performance, it'll give you lots of inside wheelspin and will push the balance more towards understeer.

I've heard you can make it work, but only if you run a lot of front spring.

You have to drop the engine cradle to install...IMO, not worth the effort. I'm personally happy with the stock front bar as is.
my car has almost no body roll at all right now without the front bar. I guess I will just go ahead and install the front bar and see what it does since it's already paid for and just sitting in my spare room.

Hopefully I can install it by myself in the driveway.
 

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I think its a matter of driving style too, but for me is for Celica its better to fit both front and rear swaybars.

I have the TRD Sportivo swaybars fitted and though I don't have experience with just installing rear swaybar, I really think it's not a good idea just to install the rear. Even now the tail can easily slide if I asked for it, and I imagine it would be hairy if I just installed the rear and not the front. So, for the sake of natural balance I think installing both front and rear swaybars is a good idea.

Other thing that swaybar helps is suspension rebound. I don't know if anyone ever mentioned it here, but other than reducing bodyroll the suspension rebounds better with stiffer swaybars.

Before fitting the swaybars, whenever I go through rough pavement the car becomes unsettled, but when the swaybars are installed passing the same pavement the shock settles quicker which in turns made the car more comfortable. That's a bonus for me because I didn't know swaybars does this also. So, having both swaybars helps both front and rear shocks too.

I am not sure if front swaybars give lots of inside wheelspin though, but I would think that issue can be sorted through wheel alignment to suit? I haven't have any traction problem so far in spirited driving and my tyre wear looks fine (-1.8 camber with total toe +1 at the front).

But again, it depends on individual driving style. And since installing rear is a breeze, try that first and see how it goes. If its too snappy for you, then install the front to balance it out :)
 

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I am not sure if front swaybars give lots of inside wheelspin though, but I would think that issue can be sorted through wheel alignment to suit?
No. The problem is a stiffer sway bar transfers more load to the outside wheel than a lighter one. Thus the inside wheel has less weight on it. Available traction (assuming constant coefficient of friction) is linearly dependent on the amount of weight on the tire. The inside front gets unloaded too much with a stiffer sway bar, so unless you have an LSD you're not going to be able to put any power down.

This is partly why the rear wheel in my sig is in the air. I've transferred so much weight off the inside rear the load has basically gone down to zero, and so the tire goes up in the air.

Even now the tail can easily slide if I asked for it
Then don't ask for it.

Best cure for FWD oversteer is a wide open throttle - for the reasons I mentioned above. The acceleration transfers weight to the rear, resulting in increased grip. By the same token, the worst thing you can do is lift or even brake mid-turn (the deceleration reduces weight on the rear, resulting in decreased grip). If you understand weight transfer, then you'll truly know how to drive your car and how to keep it out of trouble.

PS: I trailbrake like I'm insane. Get good tires. ;)
 

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Yup, I understand weight transfer and your example is true. In particular being fwd once lift-off or brake during mid corner at high speed catching the oversteer is tricky and if its snap oversteer then its all over. Although what i meant by asking for it is not exactly to what you described, it's just an example of what could happened and not that I wanted to. Not on public road at least.

Which is why I said its better to install the front swaybar also, because even having both swaybars installed, the celica can still slide or oversteer if that's what they wanted. As most cars here are daily driven, upgrading just the rear swaybar to increase oversteer ability of the car can turn out to be very dangerous for road use application.

If it's auto-x set up then installing just the rear swaybar can be favorable and even if the car lose control at least it does so in controlled environment and not in public roads.

But again, it all depends on the driver and what he/she wanted to achieve from the car :) And yes, buying good tires is a must for any type of driver.

PS - is that Regamaster wheels you have there in your car?
 

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Sway bars make your suspension less independent. If you just got stiffer springs, you could reduce body roll while still keeping your independent suspension. No need to just go buying parts like swaybars just because they sound cool. Think about the end result you want, then look at the options available to achieve it. In this case, I wouldn't get stiffer swaybars until I had already tried stiffer springs. I think a spring rate of 300 in front and 450 in the back with Koni shocks dialed in to match would give the reduced body roll you're looking for and still maintain independence in the suspension. Groundcontrol coil overs have so many spring rate choices that you should never need to install stiffer sways on your car.
 

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so tempting hearing all of u guys talking about no body-roll with the sways :s lol
 

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Did you unbolt the power steering rack from the engine cradle?
I tried that when I did mine... there's one bolt on the driver side nearest the front of the car that's a B!TCH to get to. It's SO much easier if you go under the dashboard and disconnect the column and let the cradle drop down that way.
 

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I tried that when I did mine... there's one bolt on the driver side nearest the front of the car that's a B!TCH to get to. It's SO much easier if you go under the dashboard and disconnect the column and let the cradle drop down that way.
I will try that this weekend when I install my front sway. Thanks for the tip man.
 

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yep. and be careful with the bolts holding the bracket on. be sure to spray them and let them sit overnight before you do it. The last thing you want is for them to snap on you. I had 2 snap on me. luckily I had a lift to make things easier.
 
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