NewCelica.org Forum banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm a complete newbie when it comes to servicing my car and I just wanted to share my 2 thoughts on using a jack.

Some of this is depicted in the Toyota Owner's manual when using the emergency scissor jack found in your trunk. However, I had a bit of trouble figuring out how to use my newly purchased hydraulic jack.

For full instructions on how to use a hydraulic jack, you can find a long-winded video online HERE

HERE


First off, this is the jack I used



and I used these jackstands




The front jacking point can be found midline about 1 foot back from the front bumper here



The rear jacking point can also be found midline and consists of the frame crossbar at the centerpoint here



There are other jacking points but for my purposes - tire rotation and changing tires, these are the safest jacking points that I could find.

A couple of other points

1) My jack did not quite lift the car high enough for my purposes. The trick here is to put the jack on top of some pieces of plywood to "lift it up". The other thing that you can do is put a hockey puck on the top of the jack (between the car and jack) which adds another 1 - 1.5".

Also, if you are using a jack on a softer surface that can be damaged (ie: asphalt); make sure you put the jack on top of a good piece of plywood so it doesn't sink in.

2) ALWAYS use a jackstand if you have them. You can place them on the regular jacking points that are found just behind the front wheels and in front of the back wheels. This is actually described well in the Owner's manual.

3) Loosen the wheels first before you start jacking up the car if you are rotating wheels.

4)If you are actually doing work under the car; after you jack it up, lower it back onto the jackstands if you have them. Also, ALWAYS, ALWAYS chock/put bricks blocks behind the wheels so that the car doesn't slip. Manual cars should be put into gear and the hand brake should be fully deployed.


Hope this is helpful, I did a search on the forums and although jacking points are discussed, there were no pictures.

Kevin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Nice pic :) where were you when I was looking around for this information yesterday ;)

Thanks

Kevin
 

·
Electromagnetic Wave :-h
Joined
·
15,203 Posts
You may find that if you use the Blue jack points in that pic (particularly the front)... you won't need the block of wood to get it high enough to remove both wheels on that side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
What if I want to put the car up on stands for a long period of time, do put the stands in the positions the manual says, or is there a better place to put the car up on jacks?
 

·
Daddy Daycare
Joined
·
20,263 Posts
What if I want to put the car up on stands for a long period of time, do put the stands in the positions the manual says, or is there a better place to put the car up on jacks?
You use the jackstand positions, there really aren't any better options.
 

·
Daddy Daycare
Joined
·
20,263 Posts
Try it out, if you see any bending then stop. ;)

Just make sure neither the jack or the stands can slip from under it.
 

·
Muffinboy
Joined
·
1,606 Posts
Wouldn't the weight of the car squish that from a round shape to an oval, causing some suspension problems?
The arc/circle is one of the most stable shapes, next to the triangle.
 

·
Daddy Daycare
Joined
·
20,263 Posts
You'll have to try and see. That type of head isn't ideal for flat spots as you are going to concentrate the load in two points instead of spreading it.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top