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Hi folks

I plan on getting new aftermarket wheels that need conical seat lug nuts for proper fastening.
 

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Hi folks

I plan on getting new aftermarket wheels that need conical seat lug nuts for proper fastening.
Make sure u get hub rings too. 99/100 times the hub bore of the wheels dont match a car when you buy them.

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and if you plan on any spirited driving with significant braking avoid the plastic hub rings.
This isnt... entirely... accurate... metal rings will cause a sugnificant amount of corrosion to both the wheels and the hubs which in turn puts alot of stress and damage on your BACK while you try to beat them off with a sledge hammer after a few months.

Unless your TRACK racing where ur brakes are glowing (under this case you wouldnt use cheap after market wheels that need hub rings as your wheels would crack and break from the stress) this wont be an issue. The wheels act at a heat sink and wont cause any real issues under "spirited" driving. You wouldnt even see an issue with this during a normal autocross event.

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Aren't the OEM lug nuts conical? Pretty sure mine were.
 

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Oem lugs are lug-centric the ones with the shank. Aftermarket are normally hubcentric

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interesting theory about corrosion and stress. my rings are made of an aluminum alloy very similar to the alloy used in my not-so-cheap aftermarket wheels. my aluminum wheels and rings do not show any signs of corrosion after 4 years of use. since most plastic does not conduct heat well at all, it doesn't matter if it is in contact with a heat sink. if the plastic is subject to even moderately high temperature, it will lose structural integrity. a 10 minute hustle on a curvy road with some elevation change will get brake temps way higher than any autocross segment i have ever seen.
 

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interesting theory about corrosion and stress. my rings are made of an aluminum alloy very similar to the alloy used in my not-so-cheap aftermarket wheels. my aluminum wheels and rings do not show any signs of corrosion after 4 years of use. since most plastic does not conduct heat well at all, it doesn't matter if it is in contact with a heat sink. if the plastic is subject to even moderately high temperature, it will lose structural integrity. a 10 minute hustle on a curvy road with some elevation change will get brake temps way higher than any autocross segment i have ever seen.
As far as your heat concept, in reality your brakes will give out before they generate enough heat to warp or melt the plastic. Majory of the plastics they use wont melt or deform untill well over 500deg F, which will give u massive brake fade before hand and your brake fluid boils at 400f in most cases... so.... unless you have serious TRACK TIME or REPEATED 60-0 tests youll never see that kind of temp.

Dis-similar metals corrode one another. The wheels will be a different metal then the rings and both of those are a different metal compaired to the hubs.

Go into any tireshop right by the bay door ull see a sledge hammer to get alloy wheels off a car. Then use wirewheel, chisles and a hammer to get the corrosion off before they put the wheels back on. Same reason for saying come back for a "retorque" on your lugs after xx miles. Because the corosion will sometimes prevent your wheel from being perfectly flat on your hub which backs the lugs off.

Depending on where you live and the conditions rain, snow salt ect ect this will seriously accelerate the corrosion process.

But its not a "therory" its reality, examples below.


 

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that corrosion doesn't appear to have anything to do with centering rings. as i previously mentioned, spirited driving on roads with modest elevation changes will definitely get brake temps that exceed the melting temp of any but the most exotic plastics. i commonly measure brake temps in excess of 800 degrees F at the turnaround point of one of my favorite sections of curvy road ( about 8 miles one way) with zero fade. oem pads will fail at 500 but no good pad would be close to fading at that temp. different alloys of aluminum do not act as chemically dissimilar (no hyphen necessary) metals. steel hubs and aluminum wheels will corrode as shown in your accurate pics, but the aluminum centering rings will not have any effect on the amount or speed of corrosion with or without catalysts.
 

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that corrosion doesn't appear to have anything to do with centering rings. as i previously mentioned, spirited driving on roads with modest elevation changes will definitely get brake temps that exceed the melting temp of any but the most exotic plastics. i commonly measure brake temps in excess of 800 degrees F at the turnaround point of one of my favorite sections of curvy road ( about 8 miles one way) with zero fade. oem pads will fail at 500 but no good pad would be close to fading at that temp. different alloys of aluminum do not act as chemically dissimilar (no hyphen necessary) metals. steel hubs and aluminum wheels will corrode as shown in your accurate pics, but the aluminum centering rings will not have any effect on the amount or speed of corrosion with or without catalysts.
Ur giving this person impractical and verifiably false information for what. Im not going to continue to waste my time with a keyboard warrior who thinks he cant be wrong. Just because somthing is aluminum doesnt mean it cant corrode.

There are HUNDREDS of alloy types grades different mixtures of metals and every manuf has their own mixture of herbs and spices with the alum products. They CAN AND WILL corrode the hub and wheels i worked in a tireshop for along time. I seen it and lived it and yes had to nearly beat multiple cars damn near off a lift to get the wheels off.

Unless your running around with a super high end set of brakes pads rotors caliper and metal braided hoses YOU MIGHT get to some where around 500-600f driving around like an idiot or if your braking allllll the way down a mountain. You will cook your brakes and most likely have your brakes catch fire after serious brake fade.

This is NOT the relm of possibilty for 99.99% of drivers. Nor is it even worth mentioning.

Short version: Aluminum can and WILL corrode other aluminum alloys depending on grade and mixtures. Even mildly hopped up brakes cannot support the temps your claiming nor is it practical on the street. This isnt fast an furious eventually some one will get hurt.

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If anyone gets to 800f in their brakes on the public street there is def a fault in the car but in reality a larger fault in the head of the driver. 🤣
 
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