NewCelica.org Forum banner

Should brake rotors be "polished" (as per Wagner's advice)?


  • Total voters
    1
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Was doing some research before doing my rear brakes, and came across Wagner's Tech Tips page, which had some great articles. I wanted to get feedback from real-world experiences regarding some of their advice.

I purchased the Raybestos Professional Grade rotors, as they are cheap enough ($35 CDN) that the old ones are not worth turning. I did as Wagner suggested and washed them thoroughly with soap and water, which they definitely needed. They didn't have the "mirror surface" that Wagner suggests rotors should have, so I did as they suggest, and sanded the rotors with 120-grit sandpaper, followed by 180-grit (didn't have 150). It did make a noticeable difference, and the rotors were much smoother, but it's a lot of work to do by hand! If I was shopping for rotors again, I would probably spend a bit more to get something pre-polished.

Also, when I removed the rotors (which were rusted on), I found the insides were badly rusted, and I also had to clean the corrosion off the parking brake pads (on the insides of the rotors - I have never serviced them before, so I wasn't aware of how the system worked). Are the better-quality brake rotors less likely to rust? I don't drive the car hard, so I didn't think I had a need for performance rotors.

They also recommend using specific lubricants on various components when servicing the brakes. I used a standard synthetic brake lube on the guide pins (assuming this is the correct term for the two pins that go through the pads), and did not use lube on the back of the pads, as it is not recommended for the Wagner ThermoQuiet ceramic pads I bought. Any thoughts on the lubricants they mention?

The previous pads were worn unevenly, as per the last picture here (tapered pads). The caliper sliders were not seized, but the pad pins were extremely dirty / rusty, which I believe may have been causing the issue. What have other people found with this - do you lubricate the pins? If so, what type of lube do you use? I am wondering if a dry lube would be a better option, to prevent dirt from sticking to the pins. And are there better quality pins available, that will help this situation? I am replacing the calipers, pads, and rotors, but none of them are as bad as I initially expected, and I am thinking now that perhaps I should be doing some maintenance on the brakes when I do my semi-annual tire swap / rotation - I believe I could get a lot more life out of the components. Does anyone do this type of maintenance on the brakes in between replacing components (ex., cleaning or replacing pins, etc.)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Was doing some research before doing my rear brakes, and came across Wagner's Tech Tips page, which had some great articles. I wanted to get feedback from real-world experiences regarding some of their advice.

I purchased the Raybestos Professional Grade rotors, as they are cheap enough ($35 CDN) that the old ones are not worth turning. I did as Wagner suggested and washed them thoroughly with soap and water, which they definitely needed. They didn't have the "mirror surface" that Wagner suggests rotors should have, so I did as they suggest, and sanded the rotors with 120-grit sandpaper, followed by 180-grit (didn't have 150). It did make a noticeable difference, and the rotors were much smoother, but it's a lot of work to do by hand! If I was shopping for rotors again, I would probably spend a bit more to get something pre-polished.

Also, when I removed the rotors (which were rusted on), I found the insides were badly rusted, and I also had to clean the corrosion off the parking brake pads (on the insides of the rotors - I have never serviced them before, so I wasn't aware of how the system worked). Are the better-quality brake rotors less likely to rust? I don't drive the car hard, so I didn't think I had a need for performance rotors.

They also recommend using specific lubricants on various components when servicing the brakes. I used a standard synthetic brake lube on the guide pins (assuming this is the correct term for the two pins that go through the pads), and did not use lube on the back of the pads, as it is not recommended for the Wagner ThermoQuiet ceramic pads I bought. Any thoughts on the lubricants they mention?

The previous pads were worn unevenly, as per the last picture here (tapered pads). The caliper sliders were not seized, but the pad pins were extremely dirty / rusty, which I believe may have been causing the issue. What have other people found with this - do you lubricate the pins? If so, what type of lube do you use? I am wondering if a dry lube would be a better option, to prevent dirt from sticking to the pins. And are there better quality pins available, that will help this situation? I am replacing the calipers, pads, and rotors, but none of them are as bad as I initially expected, and I am thinking now that perhaps I should be doing some maintenance on the brakes when I do my semi-annual tire swap / rotation - I believe I could get a lot more life out of the components. Does anyone do this type of maintenance on the brakes in between replacing components (ex., cleaning or replacing pins, etc.)?
Polishing=Pure BS !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
That green permatex stuff in the mustard packets at the autozone counter fucking blows. Get good silicone stuff like sylglide. And also 3M's high heat copper stuff for the non-rubber parts of the braking system.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top