NewCelica.org Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
791 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, this is a "How I" guide, not a "how to." This is just how I did it, and I don't claim that it's the best way... but just how I ended up doing it ;)

First off, my power steering was brown... dark cola brown. Definitely not the red that it should be. I called the dealership to get an idea of what cost was to change it and I was told "it doesn't ever need to be changed." Well a few months later I was a lil dissatisfied about that answer. After searching the internet I found the answer I was looking for.

Like all fluids, power steering fluid deteriorates over time and picks up contaminants. Most vehicles do not have a recommended replacement interval for power steering fluid, but most suppliers of new and remanufactured steering racks and pumps recommend changing the fluid when replacing these components to prevent damage caused by dirty, worn-out fluid.

As power steering fluid recirculates between the pump and gear, it picks up small wear particles of metal. Since there's no filter in the system, any junk that's picked up by the fluid ends up in the steering gear where there are a lot of nooks and crannies to trap debris.

Another source of fluid contamination can be aging hose. Small pieces of rubber can flake loose from the inner hose lining and be carried away by the fluid. Though not abrasive, the debris can become trapped under seal lips and open a path for internal pressure loss.

High underhood temperatures are also hard on the fluid. As the fluid ages, it oxidizes and breaks down. This causes a loss of lubricity that accelerates wear in both the pump and steering gear. It can also leave varnish deposits that have an adverse effect on the operation of the pump and the spool valves inside the steering rack. The viscosity of oxidized fluid is also different from that of fresh fluid, which can add to steering stiffness when the system is cold.

For all of these reasons, flushing the steering system and refilling it with fresh fluid is a must anytime a power steering pump or rack is replaced. A flush and fill is also a good idea when replacing a hose on a high-mileage vehicle.

Though most customers would probably balk at the idea, replacing the fluid every 50,000 miles or so for preventive maintenance can help prolong the life of the hydraulic components in the steering system. In fact, anytime you check the fluid level you should also note its physical appearance and odor. If the fluid is badly discolored (dark murky brown in color), a burnt odor or contains visible dirt or other debris, replacing the fluid now might save your customer some repairs down the road
Source: http://www.babcox.com/editorial/bf/bf50154.htm

So anyway, I'm ready to change the fluid... but realize the return hose to the PS pump is way down low and a pain to reach. It's really difficult to even undo the clamp, plus it'll be hard to see the fluid as it come out. So here's what I did.

I Undid the clip which holds the PS reservoir in. Disconnected the hose from the reservoir (towards the front of the car). I immediately capped off the reservoir end. For the open hose, I took an 8inch or so length of garden hose and shoved it onto the rubber hose. I then put the end of it into a 20oz bottle. It was perfect. It made the hose long enough to go into the bottle and kept everything clean :). So with the engine off, and the key in the ignition (ready to start/power) I turned the steering wheel back and forth. Surprisingly the fluid drained rather quickly. Unfortunately my reservoir was so dirty there was a brown line that made it appear full. GRRRRR:angry: So I filled up the reservoir and proceeded to do this until I go to my 2nd bottle of P.S. fluid. I got to about 1.5 quarts when red fluid started coming out. It was still rather dirty and I should've bought another bottle to help flush everything out but I got the bulk of the crap out of there.

All done, I started the car and gave it some swift turns back and forth and checked it again. Topped off the reservoir and did it again. No bubbles, everything looked great. Yay. Ok I did have some other stumbles, and the above way was the best way to do it (for me).


TRANSMISSION OIL... easy, but I was rather pissed off because the "guide" I read off Celica garage said to use Redline 75/90NS. So that's what I used. Well I read MT90 was also suitable and ultimately discovered that MT90 is best for Street driven cars since it doesn't eat up the synchros. Needless to say, I was a little disturbed about reading the last sentence (and pissed.)

GL-5 gears oils which are required in hypoid differentials are not used in most synchromesh transmissions because the chemicals used to provide the extreme pressure protection can be corrosive to synchronizers, which are commonly made of brass or bronze. Typically, the use of a GL-5 lubricant in a synchromesh transmission will shorten the synchronizer life by one half.
Source: http://www.redlineoil.com/frames/mtlti.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,521 Posts
Damn...I used the 75W90NS and now one of my synchro's is worn out...holy crap...I remember reading that everyone was using that, so I used it too...

Damn...Toyota is replacing my entire tranny with a brand new one, so I guess I am lucky...

Usman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
791 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes that's good. When I read that, I went out and bought (and changed) my tranny fluid the next day. It's only been in for one year, but I also added around 20K milesish to it too.

Shame on me for not doing enough research :1
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Does your car comes with automatic transmission fluid on the power steering? Mine came with power steering fluid straight from the factory. When I flush mine, I used Dextron as the manual recommended and seems to be fine. I used a plastic bag to catch the old fluid but it was still a pretty messy job.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top