NewCelica.org Forum banner

1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
47,946 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Toyota eyes turbos
Toyota Motor Corp. plans to introduce 11 new or redesigned hybrid vehicles by 2012, but the carmaker is hardly neglecting the humble internal combustion engine.

Takeshi Uchiyamada, executive vice president in charge of r&d, also wants to increase the fleet's fuel efficiency by putting turbochargers and direct fuel injection in smaller vehicles. "In the next five years, the general trend is downsizing of engines and the use of turbochargers," Uchiyamada said in an interview. "Another development will be direct fuel injection."

Turbos and direct fuel injection will be added throughout Toyota's lineup--even in four-cylinder engines and models such as the Corolla and Camry, he said.

"Eventually, we will see significant numbers of vehicles carrying engines with turbochargers," said Uchiyamada, 64, who was chief engineer of the first-generation Prius.

Other changes will include expanded use of idle-stop technology, which saves fuel by turning off the engine when the car comes to a standstill, and advances in variable valve systems.

Toyota will need the new technologies to stay ahead of sharper competition from rivals such as South Korea's Hyundai Motor Co., which is trying to become a green car leader.

Of the 11 upcoming hybrids, four will be model changes of existing hybrids. The other seven will be new models, either stand-alone hybrids or hybrid versions of vehicles that previously didn't have a gasoline-electric option, Uchiyamada said.

He expects Toyota's annual hybrid sales to hit 1 million units by 2015. In 2009, Toyota sold approximately 530,000 hybrids worldwide.

But in the United States, he predicted, hybrids will still only account for between 10 percent and 20 percent of Toyota's sales by 2020.
.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
47,946 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Toyota Ready to Fight Back With Downsized Turbo Engines
Some help from the Great Gazoo.

Toyota is hoping to take a giant leap into the future with the help of the Great Gazoo. That’s Gazoo Racing Masters of Nurburgring, or GRMN, which partnered with the giant automaker to pull together a turbocharged version of the Toyota Vitz for the recent Tokyo Auto Salon.

The 178-horsepower subcompact – known in much of the rest of the world as the Yaris – is more than a one-off show car, however. Industry sources say it’s a sign of things to come from Toyota, which has been focusing the major portion of its engineering resources on gas-electric hybrids while most of its key competitors are racing to market with downsized, direct injection turbo engines.

Turbos may not yield quite the urban fuel economy of a hybrid but they deliver more customer-pleasing performance than the typically anemic hybrid, along with improved highway mileage. They’re also, typically, a lot cheaper than hybrid systems that depend on more complex driveline components, including expensive battery packs.

Toyota has also lagged behind on several other key powertrain developments, including direct injection – a more efficient ways of pumping the fuel/air mixture into an engine’s cylinders that can boost both performance and mileage – and next-generation transmissions. Though it offers a state-of-the-art 8-speed automatic on its flagship Lexus LS sedan, the compact crossover the RAV-4 still relies on a dated 4-speed.

But the Yaris GRMN Turbo shown at the Tokyo Auto Salon is apparently a sign that Toyota is getting ready to quite literally shift gears. According to various sources, the maker has an aggressive development program underway to catch up on the development of direct injection – or DI – and turbocharged engines, with a number of small and midsized products likely to get the more advanced powertrains in the next few years.

“They’re not going to be able to keep up otherwise,” says Dave Sullivan, an analyst with the consulting firm AutoPacific, Inc.

According to one report in a small Japanese business daily, the first DI turbo engines could begin to appear in domestic Toyota products, such as the Crown model, as early as 2013. The maker also plans to roll out those powertrains in models it sells in China and Europe.

While the report did not specifically cite plans for the U.S., “We expect it to be a potential market for such technology to further increase the competitiveness of (Toyota) products,” says Kurt Sanger, an automotive analyst with Deutsche Bank.

He and other sources contacted by TheDetroitBureau.com anticipate that the next-generation Corolla is the model most likely to get Toyota’s first direct injection turbo engine – though Sanger believes a turbocharged inline-four could be added to the powertrain options for the current-generation Camry sedan “without waiting for a full model change.”

Turbocharged engines are rapidly becoming a common option for makers ranging from Hyundai to Ford – the last selling its offerings under the EcoBoost label. They typically command a premium of $1,000 or more, but the added cost is usually a lot less than for a hybrid option. The midsize Hyundai Sonata Hybrid starts at $26,610, with the MSRP for the Sonata 2.0T set at $24,645.

Until now, says Sullivan, Toyota “has made it clear hybrids are their strategy.” As recently as this month, Jim Lentz, the CEO of Toyota Motor Sales USA, reiterated the maker’s position that it plans to offer a hybrid option in “just about everything we offer.”

That may eventually pay off as federal mileage standards rapidly rise, but U.S. motorists, in particular, have shown a surprising indifference to the technology. The Toyota Prius is the segment’s best-seller, accounting for nearly half of all hybrid sales in 2011, but add up all the gas-electric vehicles on the market and hybrids generated a collective 274,927 sales last year. Ford is nearing that number with its EcoBoost alone.

Part of the challenge for Toyota has been that the maker had to divert a major chunk of its engineering resources to resolve quality and safety issues that forced it to recall more than 17 million vehicles over the last several years. It is reportedly working with outside firms, like GRMN, to help it fire up its turbo development efforts.

Toyota isn’t the only Japanese maker to be slow on the draw with turbos and direct injection. Honda officials were long reluctant to embrace the technologies, also in part because of their focus on hybrid technology. But Honda unveiled a line-up of new DI and turbocharged engines during the recent Tokyo Motor Show, collectively known as EarthDreams technology. They will begin appearing in the Honda line-up with the launch of upcoming products like the 2013 Accord.
.
 

·
Daddy Daycare
Joined
·
20,305 Posts
You win some, you lose some. They committed to hybrids and are a front-runner there but lost in other areas. I'm surprised though that the article says they are lagging behind in DI technology. I was under the impression that they had quite a lot of engines with direct injection for a long time already. Maybe the article is speaking of DI+Turbo?
 

·
@celicatoast
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
does anyone now if they officially have an Supra hybrid or something in the future? I would think with the Acura NSX coming out, Toyota will have to step up... :shrugs:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,466 Posts
Rather late and they're (going to continue) paying for it...
 

·
Theoretical Gear Head
Joined
·
754 Posts
Don't see Toyota having any problem implementing DI turbo tech. Turbos aren't exactly new. Seems tackling hybrids 1st was a smarter move. Two reasons why. Making a hybrid work is far harder and having that knowledge makes creating a DI turbo hybrid that much easier. Not to mention that in the long run hybrids and then full eclectics might become the norm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,466 Posts
Except that the rapid tech turnover rate invalidates old tech and old battery tech at a rapid rate... DI and turbo tech will not change all that much.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
47,946 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Toyota overhauls engine's

Toyota's engine overhaul
Hybrid leader trails in turbos, fuel injection

For years, Toyota Motor Corp. has put hybrids at the center of its powertrain technology strategy, all but oblivious to the rapid fuel economy advancements rivals have made in the humble gasoline engine.

Meanwhile, Ford, Honda, Mazda, Hyundai, Volkswagen and others have turned to gasoline direct fuel injection and turbochargers. For them, those technologies were a quick, cost-effective route to better mpg. Turbochargers, for example, allowed them to maintain power output while making engines smaller, for a significant weight savings and higher fuel economy.

Now, in a major overhaul of its lineup, Toyota is playing catchup. It will introduce a new direct-injection engine next year and follow with a downsized turbocharged powerplant -- its first -- in 2014. It is also committing to continuously variable transmissions across its range of small- to medium-sized cars.

Toyota is hardly forsaking gasoline-electric hybrids. It plans to introduce 14 new hybrids by 2015. But hybrids, led by the Prius, still represent only 10 percent of Toyota's global sales.

Toyota's latest environmental technology game plan, unveiled in Tokyo, shows it will start doubling down on the standard powertrains that are the backbone of its offerings. And Toyota expects big gains in fuel economy for its nonhybrid vehicles.

"By 2015, through improvement in the engine and powertrain alone, we aim to achieve a fuel-efficiency improvement of 10 percent to 20 percent on the models adopting the improvements," Takeshi Uchiyamada, Toyota's outgoing product development chief, said.

The rollout won't happen overnight. Engineers are still debating how widely technologies such as direct injection and turbocharging should be applied.

Insiders say President Akio Toyoda, who wanted to make his company's cars zippier to drive without sacrificing fuel economy, urged his staff to embrace nonhybrid technologies.

Moreover, Toyota plans to combine direct injection with its hybrid system to deliver a new generation of hybrids that are all the more miserly with fuel.

Key elements of Toyota's plan:

• A 2.5-liter direct-injection, Atkinson cycle engine, to be deployed first in hybrids in 2013.

• A 2.0-liter downsized turbo-charged engine in 2014.

• A shift to CVTs in small- to mid-sized vehicles.

• More six- and eight-speed automatic transmissions for larger cars.


Today, the company doesn't offer any turbocharged vehicles. It experimented briefly with turbos in the 1980s but chiefly as a way to boost output from already powerful engines -- not as a way of getting more oomph from smaller, more efficient ones. And direct injection is limited to a handful of large-displacement V-6 and V-8 luxury sedans, such as the Lexus LS.

Compare that with rivals' lineups. Ford Motor Co., for instance, makes extensive use of turbocharging, from engines with displacements as small as 1.0 liter to engines in its big pickups. Honda Motor Co. and Mazda Motor Corp. are overhauling their engine lineups to make fuel injection their base technology.

From 2013
Starting next year, Toyota will answer by piggybacking its D-4S direct-injection technology onto its AR family of four-cylinder gasoline engines. Toyota's AR engines are used in such models as the Toyota Camry, RAV4, Highlander and Venza and the Lexus RX. The injectors are supplied by Denso Corp.

A direct-injection, 2.5-liter AR four-banger initially will go into the hybrid version of the Toyota Crown, a Japan-market sedan. Future deployments could go in the Camry or other AR cars.

"This is the beginning of gasoline direct injection for the four-cylinder engines," said Takashi Shimura, general manager for engine development. "Smaller engines will be following this engine. As a trend, this is right. It will be standard."

Shimura said direct injection will start in bigger engines and trickle down to smaller ones. He didn't give a timeline.

In 2014, Toyota will introduce a downsized 2.0-liter, four-cylinder turbocharged AR engine based on the 2.5-liter powerplant. Toyota declined to identify the model or the turbocharger supplier.

Pairing direct injection with Toyota's hybrid technology can boost the system's overall fuel efficiency by 10 percent, said Satoshi Ogiso, chief engineer for the Prius family of hybrids.

But it is still unclear whether the next-generation Prius, due around 2014, will get direct injection.

Cost issues
The problem is balancing the added cost of fuel injection against the goal of making the Prius as affordable as possible. Cost sensitivity is compounded because the Prius, with its extra battery, electric motor and inverter, is already pricey to build. Direct injection would add an extra ¥10,000 ($128) to the car's cost, engineers say.

"It may be possible, but it still has to undergo a lot of discussion," Ogiso said. "That's because the Prius engine already has very good fuel efficiency without direct injection."

Yoshihiko Matsuda, field general manager in charge of engine engineering, says direct injection could be applied in hybrids with engine displacements of 2.0, 2.5 or 3.0 liters. But he said using it in a 1.6-liter hybrid would be "borderline" -- delivering only incremental benefit for the added cost.

The current Prius has a 1.8-liter engine.

Toyota will use a newly refined version of the Denso-made D-4S injector. It was first used this year in the Lexus GS and the Scion FR-S sporty car manufactured by Subaru-builder Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd.

It improves mileage about 1 percent over Toyota's earlier D-4S injector, which debuted in 2006. It gets better results by using a slit-shaped, instead of a multihole, injector opening. That creates a richer fuel mixture inside the cylinder.

Toyota's embrace of more widely used technologies comes as it concedes it misread market demand for other alternative drivetrain technologies, including electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids.

In announcing plans for Toyota's own EV, Uchiyamada said the company would sell only about 100 of the cars in the United States and Japan on a limited basis, starting this December.

Two years ago, he predicted Toyota would be selling thousands of the EV, which is based on the Scion iQ minicar and called the eQ.

"But two years later, we found other conditions prevailing in the market, and we'll undertake a limited introduction," he said, in a tacit nod to the tepid sales of other makers' electric cars.

Uchiyamada added that sales of the Prius Plug-in, which began in Japan in January, were lower than expected. He said that car needs better marketing.

But Toyota is bullish on hybrids.

Toyota plans to launch 21 new or redesigned hybrid vehicles by the end of 2015. Toyota didn't name the models. But 14 will be either all-new nameplates or hybrid versions of vehicles that don't currently come with an electric-gasoline option.
.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,646 Posts
I would love to see a toyota 2.5 or 2 liter turbo. it's really about time. what time of weight savings do you usually see going from a v6 to a i4 turbo? for instance, what's the weight of an r32 golf vs a typical 2.0t golf? it's too bad that toyota hasn't embraced direct injection as rapidly as the competition has.
 

·
The Original 1zz Fanboy
Joined
·
3,774 Posts
I like the idea of a 2.0T but I have a feeling this is going to lead to Camry's and Corolla's being faster than the FR-S....not that the Camry isn't already.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
47,946 Posts
Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Toyota to enter turbo-four wars with Lexus by '15
Toyota Motor Corp. will offer its first turbocharged 2.0-liter, four-cylinder engine in Lexus vehicles beginning in late 2014 or early 2015.

Several other automakers already offer 2.0-liter turbos, but Toyota's first will be available in a new compact crossover that will be named NX 200t, according to filings with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

The NX 200t will be joined by a hybrid model, called NX 300h, according to trademark filings. Timing for the rollout of the two models may differ in various global markets. The United States may not see the turbo-four until 2015, a Toyota insider said.

The source said the engine likely will be extended to other models in Toyota's global lineup, possibly replacing the 2.5-liter V-6 as the entry-level engine in the Lexus IS sedan lineup, as well as being used in the Toyota RAV4.

Audi, BMW and Cadillac already offer 2.0-liter turbos in their entry-luxury vehicles; Mercedes-Benz's version is 1.8 liters. Ford, Volkswagen and Hyundai/Kia also offer the turbo-four setup.

A 2.0-liter turbo can offer levels of power and torque on a par with a small V-6, saving weight without sacrificing fuel economy. But a recent Consumer Reports study showed that turbo-fours can be thirstier than their standard four-cylinder brethren, especially among lead-footed drivers.
.
 

·
Daddy Daycare
Joined
·
20,305 Posts
But a recent Consumer Reports study showed that turbo-fours can be thirstier than their standard four-cylinder brethren, especially among lead-footed drivers.
This is something to watch out for. If people don't stay off boost then the fuel economy benefits might be negated.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
47,946 Posts
Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Lexus IS F Powertrain To Change, But No Hybrid Tech On The Horizon
The chief designer of the new Lexus IS says that a high-performance halo model will likely stay in the IS lineup, but that its 5.0 litre V8 won’t survive.

“That V8 is a little difficult to meet Euro 6,” Junichiro Furuyama, the 2013 IS’ chief engineer told TMR, referring to the current IS F's 5.0 litre 2UR-GSE engine.

“The engine has a high performance focus, so the combustion condition is more severe than normal engines. It’s a little more difficult than making the V6 engines comply with Euro 6."

“To produce more power and torque it runs leaner. That is the problem. We probably need a new engine for the F model.


As for what would replace it, Furuyama-san said that both naturally-aspirated and turbocharged powerplants would make sense.

In my personal opinion, what is suitable for this kind of sports model is natural aspiration or turbocharged engines,” he said.

He added that although lower-displacement turbocharged engines had their merits, they might not necessarily be in keeping with the IS F’s character.

“For power and torque the turbocharger has a big advantage, but there is some turbo lag. Natural aspiration is one of our strong points... and is a more pure experience,” Furuyama said.

But while Furuyama was vague about details of the next-generation IS F, he confirmed that Lexus’ hybrid technology won’t find its way onto the brand’s performance flagship anytime soon.

“Sometime in the future, even the F model could become a hybrid,” Furuyama said to TMR.

“In future, yes, but for this generation, no.”


The existence of a replacement for the current IS F has yet to be confirmed, although the current model remains in production.
.
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top