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Discussion Starter #1
Hey!
As a general (Stupid) question,I would like to add Traction Control system to my car. (Yes my JDM ECU has the pinout for it)
To the most of you that do not know, I have a Corolla 1997, And i've swapped in a 2ZZ into it. Had many problems, but ive finally done it all.
I had O2 sensor problems, but now i have everything working and its good.
My JDM ECU has pins for the Traction Control System, and now that everything is done, I was wondering if I could get even that working.
I Kind of need it too, as my car is 2200 lbs (1000KG) or less so its somewhat lighter than celicas i think, and when i punch the throttle in 1st i have instant redline, same story with 2nd gear, and i can feel it in 3rd too sometimes depending on the road. (I know my tires are kinda skinny too as im running on steelies atm)
If im on a fresh newly built road, punching it in feels like a completely different car because of the traction.

I wanted to know what would i need to do in order to activate the TRC system (Any sensors ill need) because the ECU has the functionality.

My car has a cable throttle and no ABS, if that's related. (And any info about converting my car to ABS would also be appreciated)
I know this forum is only for celicas, but i haven't found any 2zz related community thats this good, and also speaks english. And cmon guys the cars share the same heart theres got to be similarities. I've learnt and benefited from this forum a lot in my build and ill forever be thankful for it.

Please Enlighten me.
 

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Electromagnetic Wave :-h
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Long time, no see. You sure the clutch isn't slipping?

VSC (stability control) uses a VSC computer & sensors. TRC (Traction Control) - I have very limited info about. But, I suspect it wouldn't help much. Typically, TRC just limits engine output till wheels catch up. Maybe check the Corolla T Sport? Neither of these was available on the USDM versions.
 

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I don't have any detailed knowledge of the Celica traction control system but from other vehicles I believe the basic premise is to limit fueling to the engine until the traction control system senses the wheels gripping instead of slipping. I don't know anything about your setup, but the first things that come to mind to help with this are:
  • Make sure suspension is in top shape (including all bushings)
  • Limited Slip Differential!
  • Wider tires (preferably with wider wheels) for larger contact patch
  • Stickier rubber!
This would all help put the power to the ground instead of holding your engine back, and I would consider all of them before any power limiting options.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Long time, no see. You sure the clutch isn't slipping?

VSC (stability control) uses a VSC computer & sensors. TRC (Traction Control) - I have very limited info about. But, I suspect it wouldn't help much. Typically, TRC just limits engine output till wheels catch up. Maybe check the Corolla T Sport? Neither of these was available on the USDM versions.
Well, As of now, The clutch is slipping. But low traction has been my issue for a long time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
And even now with the clutch slipping under high load, Being on a new road with good traction makes a world of difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I don't have any detailed knowledge of the Celica traction control system but from other vehicles I believe the basic premise is to limit fueling to the engine until the traction control system senses the wheels gripping instead of slipping. I don't know anything about your setup, but the first things that come to mind to help with this are:
  • Make sure suspension is in top shape (including all bushings)
  • Limited Slip Differential!
  • Wider tires (preferably with wider wheels) for larger contact patch
  • Stickier rubber!
This would all help put the power to the ground instead of holding your engine back, and I would consider all of them before any power limiting options.
The front suspension is in top shape, Just replaced it a month back,
The rear suspension? Not so much. will be taking care of that soon. And bushings make a difference? Thats new to me. Will get them refreshed too.
LSD is my next upgrade. I am looking for a good piece atm. Just curios, Will that make a big difference? Im keeping my expectations low.
Wider tires and wheels are going to be next after the LSD. Funnily the wider tires and wheels would cost 3x more than the LSD Gear box. thats why they're second in line. What would be Ideal? 7 inch? Or 8? Or higher? I dont want the wheels to hit the body in case of suspension bottoming out. (Been a victim of blowing a tire at the middle of the track in a high speed corner because it came in contact with the body)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Also, Can I swap in an ABS system from another (Newer) car? Does the abs module need to be connected to my ECU?
Because my brakes on my stock 2019 corolla feel 10x better than on my project car thats alot lighter and more performance orientated.
 

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The front suspension is in top shape, Just replaced it a month back,
The rear suspension? Not so much. will be taking care of that soon. And bushings make a difference? Thats new to me. Will get them refreshed too.
LSD is my next upgrade. I am looking for a good piece atm. Just curios, Will that make a big difference? Im keeping my expectations low.
Wider tires and wheels are going to be next after the LSD. Funnily the wider tires and wheels would cost 3x more than the LSD Gear box. thats why they're second in line. What would be Ideal? 7 inch? Or 8? Or higher? I dont want the wheels to hit the body in case of suspension bottoming out. (Been a victim of blowing a tire at the middle of the track in a high speed corner because it came in contact with the body)
If the front bushing are worn out that leave room for play... Play in front control arms makes wheel hop quick.
LSD makes a HUGE difference in a FWD car. I have one in my MR2, and my TSX. TSX is FWD and it is much more noticable there. When you turn with heavy throttle both tires get the right amount of spin for the turn... The steering wheel does not want to clock itself back out when you are applying power. Way more control in the corners. I assume you are using a C series transmission? If so... I have a C56 with OEM Toyota LSD in my shop that needs rebuild or part out... I can pull the LSD if you are interested in buying it. Fits any C series trans.
Regarding wheels and tires I would search here and see what others have done. If it fits, I'd go with 8in wide wheels and 225 wide tires. If that is difficult to fit, I'd recommend a mild (and professional) fender roll to accommodate that setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If the front bushing are worn out that leave room for play... Play in front control arms makes wheel hop quick.
LSD makes a HUGE difference in a FWD car. I have one in my MR2, and my TSX. TSX is FWD and it is much more noticable there. When you turn with heavy throttle both tires get the right amount of spin for the turn... The steering wheel does not want to clock itself back out when you are applying power. Way more control in the corners. I assume you are using a C series transmission? If so... I have a C56 with OEM Toyota LSD in my shop that needs rebuild or part out... I can pull the LSD if you are interested in buying it. Fits any C series trans.
Regarding wheels and tires I would search here and see what others have done. If it fits, I'd go with 8in wide wheels and 225 wide tires. If that is difficult to fit, I'd recommend a mild (and professional) fender roll to accommodate that setup.
Thanks for the information on the bushings. I mean it.
As for the transmission, Im using either a C160, C64, or a C60 transmission. Ive completely forgotten because it went in more than 2 years ago.
And I'd definitely keep your LSD in mind, However there are two reasons that keep me from ordering right away.
1: I dont know if i could install the LSD in myself,
2: It would take a long time and high shipping costs to ship 8000 Miles away.
 

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I am not sure if the LSD fits the c160, thats from an older Corolla. If it transmission came with the 2zz, it should be the c60 or c64.
Wasn't aware of your location, I presume you aren't in US?
There is a quick and dirty method to install the LSD, but doing it that way you assume the risk of not having the diff bearing tolerances correct. I've done it that way twice. No issues the first time, second time I had a diff bearing go out after about 5k miles. The correct method requires a full disassembly of the transmission.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I am not sure if the LSD fits the c160, thats from an older Corolla. If it transmission came with the 2zz, it should be the c60 or c64.
Wasn't aware of your location, I presume you aren't in US?
There is a quick and dirty method to install the LSD, but doing it that way you assume the risk of not having the diff bearing tolerances correct. I've done it that way twice. No issues the first time, second time I had a diff bearing go out after about 5k miles. The correct method requires a full disassembly of the transmission.
Hey, I really appreciate you taking the time to respond. I really do.
Then it must be a C64. It was imported from japan so most probably from a Z aeroturer.
and no, sadly not in the US atm.
I (somewhat) know how to install an LSD on a rear big differential, But no idea how to on a FWD as the transmission has the differential built in I am talking abut old trucks with a big diff in the rear. i think the best way for me would be to buy a complete transmission with an LSD built in. Any pointers on how to know its an LSD besides the obvious tranny code ending with a 'B' ? Like jacking the car up and turning the wheels the other wheel should ideally move the same direction or not move at all right? and open diffs would turn the other wheel the opposite direction? I dont know if i remember this old trick correctly.
 

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And even now with the clutch slipping under high load, Being on a new road with good traction makes a world of difference.
Replace the clutch and check the pressure plate.

A world of difference? With a slipping clutch, I highly doubt that you're getting tire spin on either an old or new road. (or are you talking dirt?). But, if you are getting tire spin, tires/wheels are probably the next steps. Depending on your exact location in that country, you could probably use sticky summer tires year-round. While the LSD will most likely help & is a nice upgrade, tires/wheels are much easier to accomplish in a short space of time and, if they don't resolve the issue, the LSD & suspension are next to be looked into. If you're talking dirt roads, then the LSD might take priority over tires.
 

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The most surefire way to tell if an OEM LSD is present is to pull the axles and look at the bar inside the diff. The LSD has a much wider, flat bar across the inside.

Toyota open diff:
Screenshot_20191217-194711~2.png

Toyota helical LSD:
20130428_201447.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Replace the clutch and check the pressure plate.

A world of difference? With a slipping clutch, I highly doubt that you're getting tire spin on either an old or new road. (or are you talking dirt?). But, if you are getting tire spin, tires/wheels are probably the next steps. Depending on your exact location in that country, you could probably use sticky summer tires year-round. While the LSD will most likely help & is a nice upgrade, tires/wheels are much easier to accomplish in a short space of time and, if they don't resolve the issue, the LSD & suspension are next to be looked into. If you're talking dirt roads, then the LSD might take priority over tires.
it makes a difference because the clutch isnt slipping heavily, Just enough that the person driving it can feel it under heavy loads i.e. on uphills or a loaded car and too much gas.
And yes i can use sticky summer tires all year round unless i go up north where its always snowy.
and why i decided to go LSD first is because i can get an LSD gearbox for around $130. whereas $645 and above for a set of nice sticky tires and bigger wheels to fit in bigger brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The most surefire way to tell if an OEM LSD is present is to pull the axles and look at the bar inside the diff. The LSD has a much wider, flat bar across the inside.

Toyota open diff:
View attachment 54122
Toyota helical LSD:
View attachment 54123
Wow man!! Just wow. Love that info. Ill be very sure to use it when getting it. You're just an awesome person! You have no idea how much that helps!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
They arent that hard to find, theyre from half cut cars.They could be used or be practically brand new. Just gotta look for ones that are good.
 
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