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Ultraviolent
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7,921 Posts
Dose any one know what the Toyota dealership uses / recommends, or do they just say to use 75-90 gear lube
Just a wild guess, but probably something they sell!
yup:chuckles:


but from what i heard long ago was that GM used their gm synchro mesh for the vibe (matrix) ........ so same engines as our cars, ppl like the penzoil synchro mesh better than the gm one so id try that, i think next change imma try 2qt of mt-90 and 1qt of penzoil synchro mesh
 

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Electromagnetic Wave :-h
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15,247 Posts
Toyota doesn't sell a gear lube. Only a motor oil. Dealerships use a non-synthetic 75W-90 gear oil by the drum from their local lubricant supplier. It could be a Texaco, Castrol, Shell, Mobil, Coastal, etc. product. Many also do this w/motor oil.
 

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Zettai Unmei Mokushiroku
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28,865 Posts
Well, I don't know why any of you didn't do what I just did, which was to call Redline and get their low-down on the tradeoff between their Lightweight Shockprook and their MT90 (but then why should I be surprised by guys who believe whatever they hear someone else saying, irrespective of whatever lack of expert qualifications that person has!!).
Bottom-line, the LWSP has friction modifiers (which for anyone who wants to try it, can be purchased separately and then added to their MT90) which, although making the shifts more smoothly, can lead to premature deterioration of the synchros. If you've never opened up a tranny and understand how the synchros actually work, you need to understand that in order for them to do their job as they were designed to do, they need a certain coefficient of friction in the tranny fluid. The lubricant can actually be too slippery, which is exactly what the friction modified does.
The thing is, even if something isn't spec'd to work in an application, it doesn't mean that it can't. Remember, LWSP has been used for over a decade in MR2 transmissions with no signs of abnormal wear, where the only difference between Celica transmissions is that it has a fluid pump system (which also shouldn't work with LWSP). Beyond that, they're both synchronized transmissions, with brass synchros, separate differentials (they don't share the tranny fluid), and use GL-4 rated fluid. With LWSP, shifting becomes effortless. Most people who have mistakenly used fluids with friction modifiers have had the exact opposite experience: hard shifting. This makes sense, since the synchros need friction to grab and spin up the gears and engage, where less friction would make the synchronizing process longer.

Secondly, the LWSP has some negatives re the MT90 when it's cold (which disappear as the fluid warms up to operating temperature).
That's why they make Super Lightweight Shockproof. :D
 

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Registered
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287 Posts
I don't know exactly which generations of Celica and MR2 are being discussed by Blue Bomber, but the 7th Gen Celica (IIRC the 2000+ is the 7th Gen) and the MR2Spyder (which I have) share the same 1ZZ engine and 5MT tranny, and many on the Spyder side also swap in the 2ZZ and 6MT from the GT-S Celica (as I've done). When talking about these most contemporary Generations of the Celica and MR2, (1) there's no tranny fluid pump system, and (2) neither employs a separate differential.
I have no problem at all with someone venturing off into unknown territory trying new and different products and approaches - whether or not they've none their homework or are just seat-of-the-pants winging it. If someone wants to try piss-n-vinegar instead of antifreeze in their cooling systems, be my guest. But, unfortunately, on this forum as well as others, there are many who have very limited knowledge and/or understanding of technical things having to do with their car, and accept as gospel anything and everything that someone else posts. The point of my posting the feedback from the technical guru at Redline was to give those guys at a minimum a foundational reference point coming from the maker of the product. What they do with that sort of credible information is up to each individual.
 

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Electromagnetic Wave :-h
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15,247 Posts
where less friction would make the synchronizing process longer.
Then explain why the Shockproof is better for shifting, when LWSP has a lower coefficient of friction than MT-90?

Wear properties are a different matter. ;)
 

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Maunder Minimum
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4,518 Posts
I have no problem at all with someone venturing off into unknown territory trying new and different products and approaches - whether or not they've none their homework or are just seat-of-the-pants winging it. If someone wants to try piss-n-vinegar instead of antifreeze in their cooling systems, be my guest. But, unfortunately, on this forum as well as others, there are many who have very limited knowledge and/or understanding of technical things having to do with their car, and accept as gospel anything and everything that someone else posts. The point of my posting the feedback from the technical guru at Redline was to give those guys at a minimum a foundational reference point coming from the maker of the product. What they do with that sort of credible information is up to each individual.
Excellent point!
 

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Registered
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487 Posts
Just throwing my experience in here, I had bad grinds downshifting into 5th, 4th and 3rd with MT-90. I swapped in 1 quart of Super Lightweight Shockproof and the rest with fresh MT-90, and the grind in 3rd and 5th is gone once the transmission gets even slightly warmed up. 4th still grinds a little bit but nowhere near as badly.

Whether the improvement in shifting is due to the SLWSP or just the fresher gear oil is anyone's guess.

In the spring I might try doing straight Super Lightweight Shockproof. I'll report back then.
 
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